Etymology
Advertisement
concurrence (n.)

early 15c., "a combination for some purpose, cooperation" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from Old French concurrence (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin concurrentia "a running together," from concurrens, present participle of concurrere "to run together, assemble hurriedly; clash, fight," in transferred use, "to happen at the same time," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + currere "to run" (from PIE root *kers- "to run").

Sense of "occurrence together in time, coincidence" is from c. 1600. Meaning "accordance in opinion" is from 1660s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
consilience (n.)

1840, "concurrence, coincidence," literally "a jumping together," formed on model of resilience from Latin consilient-, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + salire "to leap" (see salient (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
syndrome (n.)
"a number of symptoms occurring together," 1540s, from medical Latin, from Greek syndrome "concurrence of symptoms, concourse of people," from syndromos "place where several roads meet," literally "a running together," from syn- "with" (see syn-) + dromos "a running, course" (see dromedary). Psychological sense is from 1955.
Related entries & more 
accordance (n.)
c. 1300, "compliance;" early 14c., "agreement, concurrence, state of being in accord," from Old French acordance "agreeing, reconciliation, harmony," noun of action from acorder "reconcile, agree, be in harmony" (see accord (v.)). Of things, "conformity, compatibility, harmony," late 14c. Meaning "formal adjustment of a difference, peace treaty" is from late 13c. Phrase in accordance with is attested by 1793 (in Middle English, in accordance of was the usual form).
Related entries & more 
amen (interj.)
Old English, from Late Latin amen, from Ecclesiastical Greek amen, from Hebrew amen "truth," used adverbially as an expression of agreement (as in Deuteronomy xxvii.26, I Kings i.36), from Semitic root a-m-n "to be trustworthy, confirm, support."

Compare similar use of Modern English certainly, absolutely. Used in Old English only at the end of Gospels, otherwise translated as Soðlic! or Swa hit ys, or Sy! As an expression of concurrence after prayers, it is recorded from early 13c.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
coincidence (n.)

c. 1600, "exact correspondence in substance or nature," from French coincidence, from coincider, from Medieval Latin coincidere, literally "to fall upon together," from assimilated form of  Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + incidere "to fall upon" (from in- "upon" + combining form of cadere "to fall," from PIE root *kad- "to fall").

From 1640s as "occurrence or existence during the same time." Meaning "a concurrence of events with no apparent connection, accidental or incidental agreement" is from 1680s, perhaps first in writings of Sir Thomas Browne.

Related entries & more