Etymology
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concrete (adj.)

late 14c., "actual, solid; particular, individual; denoting a substance," from Latin concretus "condensed, hardened, stiff, curdled, congealed, clotted," figuratively "thick; dim," literally "grown together;" past participle of concrescere "to grow together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + crescere "to grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow").

A logicians' term (opposed to abstract) until meaning began to expand 1600s (see concrete (n.)). Concrete poetry (1958), which depends much on the form or shape of its printing, is translated from terms coined independently in mid-1950s in Brazil (poesia concreta) and Germany (die konkrete Dichtung).

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concrete (n.)

1520s, "that which is material or not abstract," a noun use of concrete (adj.). Meaning "a mass formed by concretion" is from 1650s, from the literal sense of Latin concretus. Hence "building material made from sand, gravel, stone chips, etc., cemented together" (1834). 

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concretize (v.)

"to render (the abstract) concrete," 1826, from concrete (adj.) + -ize. Concrete itself sometimes was used as a verb in various senses from 1630s. Related: Concretized; concretizing.

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concretion (n.)

c. 1600, "act of growing together or uniting in one mass;" 1640s, "mass of solid matter formed by growing together or conglomeration," from French concrétion (16c.) or directly from Latin concretionem (nominative concretio) "a compacting, uniting, condensing; materiality, matter," from concretus "condensed, congealed" (see concrete (adj.) ). Related: Concretional; concretionary.

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rebar (n.)

also re-bar, "steel reinforcing rod in concrete," 1961, from re(inforced)bar (n.1).

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precast (adj.)

of concrete, "formed by casting before being set in place," 1914; see pre- + cast (v.).

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cake (v.)
"to form into a cake" (trans.), c. 1600; "to concrete into a hard mass" (intrans.), 1610s; from cake (n.). Related: Caked; caking.
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extension (n.)

c. 1400, "swelling, bulging," from Latin extensionem/extentionem (nominative extensio/extentio) "a stretching out, extension," noun of action from past-participle stem of extendere (see extend). In a concrete sense, "extended portion of something" (a railroad, etc.), from 1852. Telephone sense is from 1906.

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pillbox (n.)
also pill-box, "box for holding pills," 1730, from pill (n.) + box (n.). As a small round concrete machine gun nest, it came into use in World War I. As a type of hat, attested from 1958.
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insulation (n.)
noun of action from insulate (v.) in its various senses. From 1767 as "a blocking from electricity or heat" (by interposition of a non-conductor). Sense of "state or action of being detached from others" is from 1798. Literal meaning "act of making (land) into an island" is from 1784; that of "state of being an island" is from 1799. The concrete sense of "insulating material" is recorded by 1870.
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