Etymology
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concept (n.)
Origin and meaning of concept

"a general notion, the immediate object of a thought," 1550s, from Medieval Latin conceptum "draft, abstract," in classical Latin "(a thing) conceived," from concep-, past-participle stem of concipere "to take in and hold; become pregnant," from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + combining form of capere "to take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp"). In some 16c. cases a refashioning of conceit, perhaps to avoid negative connotations that had begun to cling to that word.

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self-concept (n.)

also self concept, in psychology, "a person's idea of himself," 1921, from self + concept.

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percept (n.)

"immediate object in perception," 1837, from Latin perceptum "(a thing) perceived," noun use of neuter past participle of percipere "to perceive" (see perceive). Formed on model of concept.

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conceit (n.)

late 14c., "a thought, a notion, that which is mentally conceived," from conceiven (see conceive) based on analogy of deceit/deceive and receipt/receive. The sense evolved from "something formed in the mind" to "fanciful or witty notion, ingenious thought" (1510s), to "vanity, exaggerated estimate of one's own mental abilities" (c. 1600) through shortening of self-conceit (1580s).

A doublet of concept, it sometimes was spelled conceipt in Middle English. Sometimes the Italian form concetto (plural concetti) was used in English 18c.-19c. for "piece of affected wit;" OED describes it as "a term originally proper to Italian literature."

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conceptive (adj.)

1630s, "capable of conceiving mentally;" 1640s, "capable of conceiving physically;" from Latin conceptivus, from concept-, past participle stem of concipere "to take in" (see conceive). Shakespeare used conceptious "fruitful."

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territoriality (n.)
"possession and control of territory," 1839, as a concept in international law, from territorial + -ity. From 1941 in reference to animal behavior.
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arete (n.2)
important concept in Greek philosophy, "rank, nobility, moral virtue, excellence," especially of manly qualities; literally "that which is good," a word of uncertain origin.
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realization (n.)

1610s, "action of making real, a bringing or coming into existence;" see realize + -ation. Meaning "action of forming a clear concept, perception of the real existence of something" is from 1828. Related: Realizational.

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reification (n.)

1846, "mental act of materializing (a person or concept), objectivization, the regarding or treating of an idea as a thing," from Latin re-, stem of res "thing" (see re), + -fication "a making or causing." In Marxist writing, "depersonalization," translating German Verdinglichung.

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