Etymology
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compile (v.)

"to collect and present information from authentic sources, to make or form by putting together in some order written or printed material from various sources," early 14c., from Old French compiler "compile, collect" (13c.) and directly from a Medieval Latin special use of Latin compilare "to plunder, rob," probably originally "bundle together, heap up;" hence "to pack up and carry off," from com "with, together" (see com-) + pilare "to compress, ram down." Related: Compiled; compiling.

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compiler (n.)

mid-14c., "a chronicler, one who makes a compilation," from Anglo-French compilour, Old French compileur "author, chronicler," from Latin compilatorem, agent noun from compilare (see compile). Another form of the word current in Middle and early Modern English was compilator "a plagiarist; a compiler" (c. 1400), directly from Latin.

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compilation (n.)

mid-15c., "that which is compiled," also "action of compiling, act of bringing together and adapting things said or written by different persons for the exposition of a subject," from Old French compilacion "compilation, collection," from Latin compilationem (nominative compilatio) "a compilation," literally "a pillaging," noun of action from past-participle stem of compilare (see compile).

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index (v.)
"compile an index," 1720, from index (n.). Related: Indexed; indexing.
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redact (v.)

late 14c., redacten, "combine in a unity;" c. 1400, "compile, arrange" (laws, codes, etc.); early 15c., "bring into organized form;" from Latin redactus, past participle of redigere "to drive back, force back; bring back; collect, call in; bring down, reduce to a certain state," from red- "back, again" (see re-) + agere "to set in motion, drive, do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move").

The specific meaning "arrange, edit, bring into presentable literary form" is from 1851. Also in Middle English "to reduce" (to ashes, powder, etc.), early 15c. Related: Redacted; redacting; redactor; rédacteur.

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