Etymology
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communication (n.)
Origin and meaning of communication

early 15c., "act of communicating, act of imparting, discussing, debating, conferring," from Old French comunicacion (14c., Modern French communication) and directly from Latin communicationem (nominative communicatio) "a making common, imparting, communicating; a figure of speech," noun of action from past-participle stem of communicare "to share, divide out; communicate, impart, inform; join, unite, participate in," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "that which is communicated" is from late 15c.; meaning "means of communication" is from 1715. Related: Communications; communicational.

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miscommunication (n.)

"faulty or erroneous communication," by 1959, from mis- (1) + communication. Related: Miscommunicate; miscommunicated.

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telecommunication (n.)
1932, from French télécommunication (see tele- + communication). Related: Telecommunications.
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intercommunication (n.)
mid-15c., "discussion, conference," from Anglo-Latin intercommunicationem; see inter- + communication. Attested from 1881 in reference to systems of linked telephones.
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metacommunication (n.)

"a secondary communication that takes place with, or underlies, a more obvious communication," 1951, from meta- in the third sense of "transcending, overarching, dealing with the most fundamental matters of" + communication.

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communicant (n.)

"one who takes communion," 1550s, from Latin communicantem (nominative communicans), present participle of communicare (see communication, and compare communion).

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communique (n.)

"an official announcement or report," 1852, from French communiqué, originally past participle of communiquer "to communicate" (14c.), from Latin communicare "impart, inform" (see communication). Originally the heading of official statements from the French government. Fowler says better, if it must be used in English, to print it with the accent.

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*mei- (1)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to change, go, move," "with derivatives referring to the exchange of goods and services within a society as regulated by custom or law" [Watkins].

It forms all or part of: amiss; amoeba; azimuth; common; commune; communicate; communication; communism; commute; congee; demean; emigrate; emigration; excommunicate; excommunication; immune; immutable; incommunicado; mad; mean (adj.1) "low-quality;" mew (n.2) "cage;" mews; migrate; migration; mis- (1) "bad, wrong;" mistake; Mithras; molt; Mstislav; municipal; munificent; mutable; mutant; mutate; mutation; mutatis mutandis; mutual; permeable; permeate; permutation; permute; remunerate; remuneration; transmutation; transmute; zenith.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit methati "changes, alternates, joins, meets;" Avestan mitho "perverted, false;" Hittite mutai- "be changed into;" Latin mutare "to change," meare "to go, pass," migrare "to move from one place to another," mutuus "done in exchange;" Old Church Slavonic mite "alternately;" Czech mijim "to go by, pass by," Polish mijać "avoid;" Gothic maidjan "to change."
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Telex 
1932, "a communication system of teletypewriters," from tel(etype) ex(change).
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toc 
word used for the letter -t- in radio communication, 1898. Compare ack (-a-), emma (-m-).
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