Advertisement
37 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
commerce (n.)

1530s, "social intercourse;" 1580s, "interchange of goods or property, trade," especially trade on a large scale by transportation between countries or different parts of the same country, from French commerce (14c.), from Latin commercium "trade, trafficking," from com "with, together" (see com-) + merx (genitive mercis) "merchandise" (see market (n.)). It also was the name of a card game very popular in 1770s and '80s. As a verb, "have dealings with," 1590s. Related: Commerced, commercing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
commercial (adj.)

1680s, "engaging in trade," from commerce + -al (1). Meaning "done for the sake of financial profit" (of art, etc.), "prepared for the market or as an article of trade" is from 1871. Meaning "paid for by advertisements" (in reference to radio, TV, etc.) is from 1932. Related: Commercially.

Related entries & more 
trader (n.)
"dealer, trafficker, one engaged in commerce," 1580s, agent noun from trade (v.).
Related entries & more 
Paypal (n.)
e-commerce money transfer business, formed 2000 by merger of earlier firms.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
merchant (adj.)

"relating to trade or commerce; pertaining to merchants," c. 1400, from merchant (n.) and from Old French marcheant (adj.).

Related entries & more 
commercialize (v.)

"subject to the principles and practices of commerce," 1830, from commercial (adj.) + -ize. Related: Commercialized; commercializing.

Related entries & more 
commercialism (n.)

1849, "principles and practice of commerce," from commercial (adj.) + -ism. By 1889 as "predominance of commercial pursuits in a place or community."

Related entries & more 
Jaycee (n.)
1937, American English, acronym from pronunciation of J.C. (pronounced "jay-cee"), abbreviation of Junior Chamber (of Commerce).
Related entries & more 
merchandise (n.)

mid-13c., marchaundise, "trading, commerce, action or business of buying and selling goods or commodities for profit;" mid-14c., "commodities of commerce; wares, movable objects, and articles for sale or trade," from Anglo-French marchaundise, Old French marcheandise "goods, merchandise; trade, business" (12c.), from marchaunt "merchant" (see merchant). The plural had become obsolete in English by late 19c.

Related entries & more