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combine (v.)

early 15c., "to associate, unite, join two or more things together" (transitive), from Old French combiner (14c.) and directly from Late Latin combinare "to unite, yoke together," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + bini "two by two," adverb from bi- "twice" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"). Intransitive sense "unite, coalesce, come together into one body" is from 1712. Related: Combinative; combined; combining.

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combine (n.)

"machine that cuts, threshes, and cleans grain," 1900, short for combine harvester, combine mower (1857), from combine (v.). The noun was used earlier in the sense "conspiracy" (c. 1600); it became obsolete but was revived (1886) in the sense "combination or agreement between persons to further common interests."

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recombine (v.)

"combine again, enter into a new combination," 1630s, from re- + combine (v.). Related: Recombined; recombining.

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*dwo- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "two."

It forms all or part of: anadiplosis; balance; barouche; between; betwixt; bezel; bi-; binary; bis-; biscuit; combination; combine; deuce; deuterium; Deuteronomy; di- (1) "two, double, twice;" dia-; dichotomy; digraph; dimity; diode; diphthong; diploid; diploma; diplomacy; diplomat; diplomatic; diplodocus; double; doublet; doubloon; doubt; dozen; dual; dubious; duet; duo; duodecimal; duplex; duplicate; duplicity; dyad; epididymis; hendiadys; pinochle; praseodymium; redoubtable; twain; twelfth; twelve; twenty; twi-; twice; twig; twilight; twill; twin; twine; twist; 'twixt; two; twofold; zwieback.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dvau, Avestan dva, Greek duo, Latin duo, Old Welsh dou, Lithuanian dvi, Old Church Slavonic duva, Old English twa, twegen, German zwei, Gothic twai "two;" first element in Hittite ta-ugash "two years old."

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oxidize (v.)

1802 "cause to combine with oxygen" (implied in oxidizable); by 1803 in the intransitive sense of "combine with oxygen;" from oxide + -ize. Related: Oxidized; oxidizing; oxidization.

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hydrogenate (v.)
"cause to combine with hydrogen," 1809, from hydrogen + -ate (2). Related: Hydrogenated; hydrogenation.
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chlorinate (v.)

"to combine or treat with chlorine," 1836 (implied in chlorinated), from chlorine (n.) + -ate (2). Related: Chlorinating.

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summate (v.)
"to add, combine," 1900, from Medieval Latin summatus, past participle of summare "to sum" (see summation). Related: Summated; summating.
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orchestrate (v.)

"to compose or arrange (music) for an orchestra," 1855, back-formation from orchestration. The figurative sense ("to coordinate, combine harmoniously") is attested from 1883. Related: Orchestrated; orchestrating.

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interleague (adj.)
also inter-league, by 1917 in a U.S. baseball sense, from inter- "between" + league (n.). Earlier (1580s) as a verb, "to combine in a league."
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