Etymology
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Cymric (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Welsh" and their kindred, the Cornish and Bretons, by 1833, from Welsh Cymru "Wales," Cymry "the Welsh," plural of Cymro, probably from ancient combrox "compatriot," from British Celtic *kom-brogos, from collective prefix *kom- (see com-) + *brogos "district," from PIE root *merg- "boundary, border." Compare Allobroges, name of a warlike people in Gallia Narbonensis, literally "those from another land." As from 1833 as a noun, "the language of the Cymry."

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Como 
lake in Italy, named for the town along its shore, which is Roman Comum, from Celtic cumba "valley" (compare coomb). Its ancient name was Lacus Larius; Lacus Comacinus begins to appear 4c. It is associated with Virgil and the two Plinys.
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Comanche (n.)

Native-American people from the southwestern Great Plains, 1819, from Spanish, from a word in a Shoshonean language, such as Ute kimánci "enemy, foreigner." Their territory was Comancheria. Comanchero was a 19c. name given to Hispanic and American traders who dealt with the Comanches.

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Comus 

late classical god of joy and festive mirth, 1630s, from Latin, from Greek komos "a revel, merrymaking, a band of revelers" (see comedy).

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Constantine 

masc. proper name, Latin Constantinus, from constans "standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful," present participle of constare "to stand together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." With the common name-forming suffix -inus (see -ine (1)).

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