Etymology
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collude (v.)

"conspire in fraud or deception," 1520s, from Latin colludere "act collusively," literally "to play with" (see collusion). Related: Colluded; colluder; colluding.

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collusive (adj.)

"fraudulently or secretly done between two or more," 1670s, from Latin collus-, past participle stem of colludere (see collude) + -ive. Related: Collusively; collusiveness. Alternative adjective collusory (from Late Latin collusorius) is attested from 1706.

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collogue (v.)

1590s (implied in colloguing) "to flatter, curry favor," a word of unknown origin; perhaps from French colloque "conference, consultation" (16c., from Latin colloqui "speak together;" see colloquy) and influenced by dialogue or colleague. Intransitive sense "to have a private understanding with, conspire, collude" is from 1640s.

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