Etymology
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code (n.)

c. 1300, "systematic compilation of laws," from Old French code "system of laws, law-book" (13c.), from Latin codex"systematic classification of statutory law," earlier caudex "book," literally "tree trunk," hence, book made up of wooden tablets covered with wax for writing. De Vaan traces this through Proto-Italic *kaud-ek- to PIE *kehu-d- "cleaved, separate," which he also sees as the root of cauda "tail" (see coda).

Meaning "cipher, system of signals and the rules which govern their use" (the sense in secret code) is from 1808. Code-name is from 1879 (in telegraphy). Meaning "system of expressing information and instructions in a form usable by a computer" is from 1946.

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code (v.)

"to put into code," 1815, from code (n.). Specifically "to put into computer code" from 1947. Intransitive sense "write computer code" is by 1987. Related: Coded; coding.

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codex (n.)

"manuscript volume (especially an ancient one)," 1845, from Latin codex "book" (see code (n.)). Related: Codical.

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codify (v.)

"to reduce to a code or digest, to arrange or systematize," c. 1800 (Bentham), from code (n.) + -ify. Related: codified; codifying.

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codon (n.)

"one of a group of nucleotides that determine which amino acid is inserted at a given position," 1962, from code (n.) + -on.

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decode (v.)

"decipher or translate a coded message," 1896, from de- + code (v.). Related: Decoded; decoding; decoder.

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encode (v.)
1917, from en- (1) "make, put in" + code (n.). Computing sense is from 1955, usually shortened colloquially or for clarity to code. Related: Encoded; encoding.
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codicil (n.)

"a writing added to a will to explain, alter, add to, or revoke original terms," early 15c., from Latin codicillus "a short writing, a small writing tablet," diminutive of codex (genitive codicis) "book" (see code (n.)). Related: Codicillary.

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Morse code (n.)

character encoding system originally invented for use with the telegraph, by 1860, earlier Morse key (1858), so called in honor of Samuel F.B. Morse (1791-1872), U.S. inventor who produced a system of telegraphic communication in 1836. He invented both the recording telegraph and the alphabet of dots and dashes.

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black code (n.)
local or state legal restrictions on black persons, free or slave, 1774, American English, though the first reference is to French colonies in the West Indies.
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