Etymology
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cocaine (n.)

alkaloid obtained from the leaves of the coca plant, 1874, from Modern Latin cocaine (1856), coined by Albert Niemann of Gottingen University from coca (from Quechua cuca) + chemical suffix -ine (2). A medical coinage, the drug was used 1870s as a local anaesthetic for eye surgery, etc. "It is interesting to note that although cocaine is pronounced as a disyllabic word it is trisyllabic in its formation" [Flood]. Cocainism "addiction to cocaine" is recorded by 1885.

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coke (n.2)

slang shortened form of cocaine (q.v.), by 1902, American English.

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procaine (n.)

synthetic compound used as a local anesthetic, 1918, from pro- + cocaine.

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novocain (n.)
also novocaine, 1905, originally a trademark name for procaine (by Lucius & Brüning, Hoechst am Main, Germany), from combining form of Latin novus "new" (see new) + -caine, abstracted from cocaine. As a local anaesthetic, it began as a substitute for cocaine.
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toot (n.)
1640s, from toot (v.); meaning "cocaine" is attested by 1977.
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freebase 
1980 (noun and verb), in reference to cocaine. As a chemical process, it returns a salt form of an alkaloid to its pure form. Related: Freebased; freebasing.
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Coke 

soft drink, 1909, a popular shortening of the brand name Coca-Cola, perhaps influenced by the earlier slang use of coke for cocaine (another popular early name for the soft drink was dope).

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eye-candy (n.)
also eye candy, "attractive woman on a TV show, etc.," by 1978, based on a metaphor also found in nose candy "cocaine" (1930).
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crackhead (n.)

"crack cocaine addict," slang, by 1986, from crack (n.) in the drug slang sense + head (n.). In earlier slang, crack-headed meant "crazy" (1796), from the literal sense of crack.

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euphoric (adj.)
"characterized by euphoria," 1885, originally with reference to cocaine, from euphoria + -ic. The noun meaning "a drug which causes euphoria" also is from 1885. Euphoriant is from 1946 as a noun, 1947 as an adjective.
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