Etymology
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cleanliness (n.)

"state of being free from dirth or filth; habit of keeping clean," early 15c., from cleanly + -ness.

Cleanliness is indeed next to godliness. [John Wesley, Sermon "On Dress," c. 1791]
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sluttery (n.)
"neglect of cleanliness and order," 1580s, from slut + -ery. From 1841 as "an untidy room."
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hygienist (n.)
1836, "an expert on cleanliness," from hygiene + -ist. Earlier was hygeist (1716). Dental sense is recorded by 1913.
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sloven (n.)

late 15c., "immoral woman," later (16c.) also "rascal, knave" (regardless of gender); probably from a continental Germanic source, compare Middle Flemish sloovin "a scold," sloef "untidy, shabby," Dutch slof "careless, negligent," Middle Low German sloven "put on clothes carelessly," from Proto-Germanic *slaubjan, from PIE root *sleubh- "to slide, slip." Meaning "person careless of dress or negligent of cleanliness" is from 1520s. Also see slut.

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