Etymology
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civilize (v.)

c. 1600, "to bring out of barbarism, introduce order and civil organization among, refine and enlighten," from French civiliser, verb from Old French civil (adj.), from Latin civilis "relating to a citizen, relating to public life, befitting a citizen; popular, affable, courteous," alternative adjectival derivative of civis "townsman" (see city). Intransitive meaning "become civilized" is from 1868. Related: Civilized; civilizing.

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civilized (adj.)

"in a state of civilization," 1610s, past-participle adjective from civilize.

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civilizable (adj.)

"capable of being put in a state of civilization," 1840; see civilize + -able.

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uncivilized (adj.)
c. 1600, "barbarous," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of civilize (v.). Uncivil in the same sense is recorded from 1550s.
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decivilize (v.)

also decivilise, "reduce or degrade from a civilized to a savage state," 1815; see de- + civilize. Compare French déciviliser. Related: Decivilized; decivilization (1815).

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civilization (n.)

1704, in a now-obsolete sense "law which makes a criminal process civil," from civil + -ization. Sense of "civilized condition, state of being reclaimed from the rudeness of savage life" first recorded 1772, probably from French civilisation, serving as an opposite to barbarity and a distinct word from civility. From civilize + -ation. Sense of "a particular human society in a civilized condition, considered as a whole over time," is from 1857. Related: Civilizational.

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humanize (v.)
c. 1600, "make or render human," from human (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "civilize, make humane" is from 1640s. Related: Humanized; humanizing. Humanify "make human" is recorded from 1620s.
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