Etymology
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circumstances (n.)
"condition of life, material welfare" (usually with a qualifying adjective), 1704, from circumstance.
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circumstantiate (v.)

1650s, "to confirm by circumstances," from Latin circumstantia "surrounding condition" (see circumstance) + -ate (2). It was used earlier in a now-obsolete sense "place in particular circumstances" (1630s). Related: Circumstantiated; circumstantiating; circumstantiation.

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circumstantial (adj.)

c. 1600, "attending, incidental," also "derived from circumstances," from Latin circumstantia (see circumstance) + -al (1). Related: Circumstantially. Legalese circumstantial evidence "evidence from more or less relevant circumstances bearing upon a case," as distinguished from direct testimony, is attested by 1691.

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whereby (adv.)

"by what, by which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + by.

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content (n.1)

"state of mind which results from satisfaction with present circumstances," 1570s, from content (adj.). Phrase heart's content is from 1590s (Shakespeare).

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whereat (adv.)

"at what, at which," mid-13c., from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + at.

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wherewith (adv.)

"with which, that with which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + with.

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whereon (adv.)

"on which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + on (adv.).

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inexpedient (adj.)
"not suitable to the purpose or circumstances," c. 1600, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + expedient. Related: Inexpedience; inexpediently.
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straitened (adj.)
c. 1600, "too narrow;" 1716, "reduced to hardship;" past-participle adjective from strait (v.). Phrase straitened circumstances recorded from 1766.
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