Etymology
Advertisement
cigarette (n.)

"small cigar made of finely cut tobacco," rolled up in an envelop of tobacco, corn-husk, or (typically) rice paper, 1835, American English, from French cigarette (by 1824), diminutive of cigare "cigar" (18c.), from Spanish cigarro (see cigar). The Spanish forms cigarito, cigarita also were popular in English mid-19c. Cigarette heart "heart disease caused by smoking" is attested from 1884. Cigarette-lighter is attested from 1884.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cig (n.)
slang abbreviation of cigarette or cigar, attested from 1889. Elaborated form ciggy attested from 1962.
Related entries & more 
Nicorette (n.)

proprietary name of a nicotine chewing gum used to reduce the urge to smoke, 1980, from nicotine + cigarette.

Related entries & more 
spliff (n.)
conical cannabis cigarette, 1936, a West Indian word, of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
skag (n.)
"heroin," 1967, American English, earlier "cigarette" (1915), of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
doobie (n.)

"marijuana cigarette," 1960s, of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
Zippo (n.)
proprietary name of a brand of cigarette lighter, patented 1934 by Zippo Manufacturing Co., Bradford, Pa.
Related entries & more 
juju (n.2)
"marijuana cigarette," 1940, supposedly a reduplication of the middle syllable of marijuana.
Related entries & more 
fag (n.1)
British slang for "cigarette" (originally, especially, the butt of a smoked cigarette), 1888, probably from fag "loose piece, last remnant of cloth" (late 14c., as in fag-end "extreme end, loose piece," 1610s), which perhaps is related to fag (v.), which could make it a variant of flag (v.).
Related entries & more 
smoke (n.2)
"cigarette," slang, 1882, from smoke (n.1). Also "opium" (1884). Meaning "a spell of smoking tobacco" is recorded from 1835.
Related entries & more