Etymology
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chronic (adj.)

early 15c., cronik, of diseases, "lasting a long time," from Old French chronique and directly from Latin chronicus, from Greek khronikos "of time, concerning time," from khronos "time" (see chrono-). Vague disapproving sense (from 17c.) is from association with diseases and later addictions. Literal sense "pertaining to time" is rare in English. As a popular slang catch-all word for "cannabis," popularized from 1992 by "The Chronic," an album released by rapper Dr. Dre; said to be because it described especially potent marijuana, on the notion of "extreme, severe." Related: Chronical; chronically.

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chronicity (n.)

"state of being of long continuance," 1829; see chronic + -ity

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sarcoid (adj.)

"resembling flesh, fleshy," 1841, from sarco- + -oid. As a noun by 1875. The chronic disease name sarcoidosis is attested by 1936.

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Bright's disease 
"chronic nephritis," 1831, so called for English physician Richard Bright (1789-1858), who in 1827 first described it.
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pothead (n.)
also pot-head "chronic marijuana user," 1967, from pot (n.2) + head (n.). Earlier it meant "stupid person" (1530s), from pot (n.1).
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Crohn's disease (n.)

" chronic inflammatory condition of the digestive tract," 1935, for U.S. pathologist Burrill Bernard Crohn, one of the team that wrote the article describing it in 1932.

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insomnia (n.)
"chronic inability to sleep," 1620s, insomnie, from Latin insomnia "want of sleep, sleeplessness," from insomnis "sleepless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + somnus "sleep" (from PIE root *swep- "to sleep"). The re-Latinized form is from 1758.
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inveterate (adj.)
late 14c., "old," from Latin inveteratus "of long standing, chronic, old," past participle of inveterare "become old in," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + verb from vetus (genitive veteris) "old" (see veteran). From early 15c. as "firmly established by long continuance;" from c. 1500, of persons, "hardened, confirmed" (in habit, etc.). Related: Inveterateness.
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psoriasis (n.)

"chronic non-contagious skin disease characterized by dry, red patches covered with flakes," 1680s, from medical Latin psoriasis, in Late Latin "mange, scurvy," from Greek psōriasis "the itch; a being itchy," from psōrian "to have the itch," from psōra "itch, mange, scab," related to psēn "to rub" (see psilo-). Related: Psoriatic.

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cirrhosis (n.)

"chronic inflammation of connective tissue," originally and especially of the liver, 1827, coined in Modern Latin by French physician René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laennec with -osis and Greek kirros "red-yellow, yellow-brown, tawny," which is of unknown origin. The form is erroneous, presuming Greek *kirrhos. So called for the orange-yellow appearance of the diseased liver. Related: Cirrhotic.

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