Etymology
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Christianity (n.)

c. 1300, cristente, "Christians as a whole; state of being a Christian; the religion founded by Jesus," from Old French crestienté "Christendom; spiritual authority; baptism" (Modern French chrétienté), from Church Latin christianitatem (nominative christianitas), noun of state from christianus (see Christian). Gradually respelled to conform with Latin. Christendom is the older word for it. Old English also had cristennes.

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Christendom (n.)

Old English cristendom "Christianity, state of being a Christian, profession of faith in Christ by baptism," from cristen (see Christian) + -dom, suffix of condition or quality. The native formation, crowded out by Latinate Christianity except in the sense of "lands where Christianity is the dominant religion" (late 14c.). Similar formations are found in Scandinavian languages.

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christianize (v.)

1590s, from Christian + -ize. Originally intransitive ("follow or profess Christianity") as well as transitive ("make Christian, convert to Christianity"). Related: Christianized; christianizing; christianization.

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Christianism (n.)

1570s, "Christianity, the Christian religion," from Christian + -ism. Obsolete, but revived or recoined c. 2004 in reference to politicized fundamentalist Christianity in the U.S. Related: Christianist.

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Jewishness (n.)

1540s, "Judaism" (as opposed to Christianity), from Jewish + -ness. From 1822 as "Jewish quality or character."

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lapsed (adj.)

of persons, "fallen away from the faith," 1630s, past-participle adjective from lapse (v.). Originally especially to those who denied Christianity during prosecution.

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post-Christian (adj.)

by 1807 as "after the lifetime of Christ," from post- + Christ + -ian; by 1929 as "after the decline or rejection of Christianity," from Christian.

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unchristian (adj.)

1550s, "not professing Christianity" (of persons), from un- (1) "not" + Christian (adj.). Meaning "at variance with Christian principles" (of actions) is recorded from 1580s.

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antichristian (adj.)

1530s, "pertaining to the Antichrist," from antichrist + -ian; 1580s as "hostile or opposed to Christianity or Christians" (also anti-Christian); see anti- + Christian (adj.). Related: Antichristianity.

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apologist (n.)

"one who speaks or write in defense of something," especially "a defender of Christianity," 1630s, from French apologiste, from apologie, from Late Latin apologia "a speech in defense" (see apology).

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