Etymology
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cayuse (n.)

"horse, Indian pony of the northern Rockies," 1841, American English, said to be a Chinook (native Pacific Northwest) word; also the name of an Indian group and language (1825), of unknown origin.

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muck-a-muck (n.)

"(self-)important person," 1912, short for Chinook jargon high muck-a-muck, literally "plenty of food" from muckamuck "food" (1847), which is of unknown origin. Also mucky-muck; muckety-muck.

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potlatch (n.)

1845, among some American native peoples, "a gift," from Chinook jargon pot-latch, "a gift," from Nootka (Wakashan) patshatl "giving, gift." Later (1865) in sense "An Indian feast, often lasting several days, given to the tribe by a member who aspires to the position of chief, and whose reputation is estimated by the number and value of the gifts distributed at the feast" [Century Dictionary, 1895]

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wah-wah 
1926, in jazz slang, in reference to the effect on brass instruments made by manipulating the mute; of imitative origin. Later also in reference to an electric guitar effect. As an imitation of the sound of a baby crying, it is recorded from 1938. Wah-wah pedal is recorded from 1969. Compare Chinook jargon wawa "talk, speak, call, ask, sermon, language;" Cree (Algonquian) wehwew "goose," Lenape (Algonquian) wava "snow goose," all probably of imitative origin.
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