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115 entries found.
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chemist (n.)

1560s, chymist, "alchemist," from French chimiste, from Medieval Latin chimista, reduced from alchimista (see alchemy). Modern spelling is from c. 1790. Meaning "chemical scientist, person versed in chemistry" is from 1620s; looser meaning "dealer in medicinal drugs" (mostly in British English) is from 1745.

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biochemist (n.)
also bio-chemist, "student of the chemistry of life," 1894; see bio- "life" + chemist.
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chemistry (n.)

c. 1600, "alchemy," from chemist + -ry; also see chemical (adj.). The meaning "natural physical process" is from 1640s; the sense of "scientific study of the composition of material things and the changes they undergo" is by 1788. The figurative sense of "instinctual attraction or affinity" is attested slightly earlier, from the alchemical sense.

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artistry (n.)
"artistic quality," 1837, from artist + -ry; as chemistry from chemist, etc.
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bicarbonate (n.)

1814, bi-carbonate of potash; see bi- + carbonate. Apparently coined by English chemist William Hyde Wollaston.

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aldehyde (n.)

first oxidation product of alcohol, 1833, discovered in 1774 by German-born Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele, the name said to have been coined by German chemist Justus von Liebig from abbreviation of Modern Latin alcohol dehydrogenatum "dehydrogenated alcohol." Related: Aldehydic.

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Boyle's law (n.)

named for 17c. Irish-born chemist and physicist Robert Boyle, who published it in 1662.

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mendelevium (n.)

artificial trans-uranic element, 1955, Modern Latin, in honor of Russian chemist Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev (1834-1907). With metallic element ending -ium.

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holmium (n.)

rare earth element, named by French chemist Lecoq de Boisbaudran in 1886, from holmia "holmium oxide," name of an earth identified and named in Modern Latin by the earth's discoverer, Swedish chemist Per Teodor Cleve, in 1879 from Holmia, Latin name of Stockholm. With metallic element ending -ium. Holmia was isolated from erbia, the Scandinavian earth which also yielded thulium, scandium, and ytterbium.

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mole (n.4)

unit of molecular quantity, 1902, from German Mol coined 1900 by German chemist Wilhelm Ostwald, short for Molekül (see molecule).

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