Etymology
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Coumadin (n.)

by 1953, name for human anti-coagulant use of the rat poison warfarin sodium, abstracted from the chemical name, 3-(α-acetonylbenzyl)-4-hydroxycoumarin; earlier known as Dicoumarol, it attained publicity when it was used in 1955 to treat U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower after a heart attack. Coumarin as the name of an aromatic crystalline substance is by 1830 in English, from French coumarine, from coumarou, the native name in Guyana of the tonka or tonquin bean, one source of the substance.

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Saran 
U.S. trademark name for PVC used as a cling-film, 1940, by Dow Chemical Company.
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Styrofoam (n.)
1950, trademark name (Dow Chemical Co.), from -styr- (from polystyrene) + connective -o- + foam (n.).
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Mace (n.3)

chemical spray originally used in riot control, 1966, technically Chemical Mace, a proprietary name (General Ordnance Equipment Corp, Pittsburgh, Pa.), probably so called for its use as a weapon, in reference to mace (n.1). The verb, "to spray with Mace,"  is attested by 1968. Related: Maced; macing.

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Thorazine (n.)
central nervous system depressant, 1954, proprietary name (Smith, Kline & French) formed from a rearrangement of various elements in the full chemical name.
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Pentothal 
trademark name of an anaesthetic and hypnotic, 1935, refashioning of Thiopental, from pento-, in reference to the methylbutyl five-carbon group (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + first two letters of thiobarbiturate + chemical product suffix -ol.
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Tylenol (n.)
introduced 1955 as the name of an elixir for children, trade name originally registered by McNeil Laboratories, Philadelphia, Pa., from elements abstracted from N-acetyl-para-aminophenol, the chemical name of its active compound.
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Plexiglas (n.)
1935, proprietary name (Röhm & Haas) for a substance also sold as Perspex and Lucite. Often written incorrectly as plexiglass.
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LSD 
"lysergic acid diethylamide," 1950 (as LSD 25), from German LSD (1947), from letters in Lysergsäure-diäthylamid, the German form of the chemical name. For first element, see lysergic. German säure "acid" is cognate with English sour (adj.).
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Nembutal 

type of barbiturate, originally used to calm patients before anesthesia and operation, 1930, proprietary name of pentobarbitone sodium, formed from letters and syllables from N(a) "sodium" + full chemical name 5-ethyl-5-1-methylbutyl barbiturate.

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