Etymology
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chat (n.)

1520s, "chatter, frivolous talk;" see chat (v.). Meaning "familiar conversation" is from 1570s. As a name for birds with chattering cries, 1690s. Chat show for what in U.S. is a talk show is attested from 1967. Chat room in the online sense is attested by 1994, from the days when AOL ruled the World Wide Web.

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chat (v.)

mid-15c., "talk idly, babble," short for chatter (v.). Meaning "to converse familiarly" is from 1550s. Sense of "flirt with, ingratiate oneself with" (later often with up (adv.)) is from 1898. Related: Chatted; chatting.

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chit-chat (n.)

also chitchat, "familiar or trivial talk, gossip," 1710, diminishing reduplicated form of chat. The verb is attested from 1821. Related: Chit-chatting.

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chatty (adj.)

"fond of chatting, talkative," 1746, from chat + -y (2). Related: Chattily; chattiness. Chatsome is attested from 1847.

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chatoyant (adj.)

"changing in luster or color," like a cat's eye in the dark, 1816, from French chatoyant, past participle of chatoyer, from chat "cat" (see cat (n.)).

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schmooze (v.)

also shmooze, "to chat intimately," 1897 (schmoos), from Yiddish shmuesn "to chat," from shmues "idle talk, chat," from Hebrew shemu'oth "news, rumors." As a noun from 1939. Related: Schmoozed; schmoozing. Agent noun schmoozer is by 1909.

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lol (interj.)
by 1993, computer chat abbreviation of laughing out loud.
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brb 
by 1996, internet chat acronym for be right back.
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rofl (interj.)

by 1993, online chat abbreviation for rolling on the floor laughing.

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congrats (interj.)

1884, colloquial shortening of congratulations. Further colloquialized in British university slang to congratters (1895) and in online gamer chat shortened to grats (by 2000).

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