Etymology
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chamber (v.)

late 14c., "to restrain, shut up as in a chamber," also "to furnish with a chamber" (implied in chambered), from chamber (n.). Related: Chambering.

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chamber (n.)

c. 1200, "a room in a house," usually a private one, from Old French chambre "room, chamber, apartment" (11c.), from Late Latin camera "a chamber, room" (see camera).

The Old French word and the Middle English one also were used alone and in combinations to form words for "latrine, privy" from the notion of "bedroom utensil for containing urine." In anatomy, "enclosed space in a body," from late 14c. Of machinery, "artificial cavity," from 1769. Gunnery sense "part of the bore in which the charge is placed" is from 1620s. Meaning "legislative body" is from c. 1400, an extended sense from the chambers or rooms where an assembly meets. Chamber music (1765) traditionally was that meant to be performed in smaller spaces.

DA CAMERA: of the chamber, i. e. belonging to the chamber, suitable for the chamber, designed for the chamber,—a term applied to parlor or chamber music. [Godfrey Weber's General Music Teacher," Boston, 1842]
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chamber-lye (n.)
"urine used as a detergent," 1570s, from chamber (n.) in the "privy" sense + lye.
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chamber-pot (n.)

also chamberpot, "vessel for urine used in bedrooms," 1560s, from chamber (n.) in the "privy" sense + pot (n.1).

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chambered (adj.)

"divided into chambers," late 14c., past-participle adjective from chamber (v.). In reference to nautilus shells, 1819.

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chambermaid (n.)

1580s, "female servant who dresses a lady and waits on her in her room," also "woman who makes beds and cleans rooms," from chamber (n.) + maid.

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bedchamber (n.)
also bed-chamber, "a room for sleep or repose," mid-14c., from bed (n.) + chamber (n.). Now mostly archaic and replaced by bedroom.
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cameral (adj.)
"of or pertaining to a chamber," 1762, from Medieval Latin camera "a chamber, public office, treasury," in classical Latin "a vaulted room" (see camera, and compare chamber) + -al (1).
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ante-room (n.)
also anteroom, "small room giving access to a larger," especially a waiting room for visitors, 1762, literally "a room in front;" after French antichambre, Italian anticamera, from Latin ante "before" (see ante-) + camera (see chamber (n.)).
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antechamber (n.)
"chamber which gives access to a principal chamber; waiting room," 1650s, antichamber, from French antichambre (16c.), on analogy of Italian anticamera (see ante- and chamber (n.)). English spelling Latinized to ante- in 18c.
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