Etymology
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center (v.)
1590s, "to concentrate at a center," from center (n.). Meaning "to rest as at a center" is from 1620s. Sports sense of "to hit toward the center" is from 1890. Related: Centered; centering. To be centered on is from 1713. In combinations, -centered is attested by 1958.
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center (n.)

late 14c., "middle point of a circle; point round which something revolves," from Old French centre (14c.), from Latin centrum "center," originally the fixed point of the two points of a drafting compass (hence "the center of a circle"), from Greek kentron "sharp point, goad, sting of a wasp," from kentein "stitch," from PIE root *kent- "to prick" (source also of Breton kentr "a spur," Welsh cethr "nail," Old High German hantag "sharp, pointed").

The spelling with -re was popularized in Britain by Johnson's dictionary (following Bailey's), though -er is older and was used by Shakespeare, Milton, and Pope. Meaning "the middle of anything" attested from 1590s. Figuratively, "point of concentration" (of power, etc.) is from 1680s. Political use, originally in reference to France, "representatives of moderate views" (between left and right) is from 1837. Center of gravity is recorded from 1650s. Center of attention is from 1868.

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center-field (n.)

also centerfield, 1857 in baseball, from center (n.) + field (n.). Related: Center-fielder.

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centre 
chiefly British English spelling of center (q.v.); for ending, see -re.
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centerpiece (n.)

also center-piece, "ornament intended to be placed in the middle of something," 1800, from center (n.) + piece (n.1). Figurative sense is recorded from 1937.

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self-centered (adj.)
1670s, "fixed, stationary," from self- + center (v.). In reference to persons, "engrossed in the self, with little regard for others," it is recorded from 1783.
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-centric 
word-forming element meaning "having a center (of a certain kind); centered on," from Latinized form of Greek kentrikos "pertaining to a center," from kentron (see center (n.)).
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centerfold (n.)
also center-fold, "fold-out center spread of a magazine or newspaper," 1950, from center (n.) + fold (n.2). "Playboy" debuted December 1953, and the word came to be used especially for illustrations of comely women, hence "woman who poses as a centerfold model" (by 1965).
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centriole (n.)

in cytology, a minute body within a centrosome, 1896, from German centriol (1895), from Modern Latin centriolum, diminutive of Latin centrum (see center (n.), and compare centrosome).

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centrosome (n.)

name given to a region in plant and animal cells, 1889, from German centrosoma (1888), coined by German zoologist Theodor Boveri (1862-1915), from centro- (see center (n.)) + -some (3)).

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