Etymology
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cease (n.)

"cessation, stopping" (archaic), c. 1300, from cease (n.) or else from Old French cesse "cease, cessation," from cesser.

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cease (v.)

c. 1300, cesen, "to stop moving, acting, or speaking; come to an end," from Old French cesser "to come to an end, stop, cease; give up, desist," from Latin cessare "to cease, go slow, give over, leave off, be idle," frequentative of cedere (past participle cessus) "go away, withdraw, yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Transitive sense "put a stop to," now rare, is from late 14c. Related: Ceased; ceasing. Old English in this sense had geswican, blinnan.

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cease-fire (n.)

also ceasefire, "a cessation of shooting," 1916, from verbal phrase cease fire, attested from 1847 as a military command (formerly also signaled by bugles), from cease (v.) + fire (n.) in the gunnery sense. Generally two words until after mid-20c.

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ceaseless (adj.)

"without a stop or pause; unending, endless, enduring forever," 1580s, from cease (n.) + -less. Related: Ceaselessly; ceaselessness.

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unceasing (adj.)
late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + present participle of cease (v.). Related: Unceasingly (mid-14c.).
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surcease (v.)
early 15c., "cease from an action, desist," from Anglo-French surseser, Old French sursis, past participle of surseoir "to refrain, delay," from Latin supersedere "forbear, refrain or desist from" (see supersede). The English spelling with -c- was influenced by the unrelated verb cease. As a noun from 1580s.
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plateau (v.)

"enter a period of stability or stagnation, cease to rise," 1952, from plateau (n.). Related: Plateaued; plateauing.

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desist (v.)

mid-15c., "refrain;" 1520s, "to stop, cease from some action or proceeding," from Latin desistere "to stand aside, leave off, cease," from de "off" (see de-) + sistere "stop, come to a stand," from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Related: Desisted; desisting.

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discontinue (v.)

late 14c., discontinuen, "be interrupted, cease, stop," from Old French discontinuer (14c.), from Medieval Latin discontinuare "discontinue," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue). Transitive sense "cause to cease" is from late 15c. Related: Discontinued; discontinuity; discontinuous; discontinuation.

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intermittent (adj.)
c. 1600, from Latin intermittentem (nominative intermittens), present participle of intermittere "to leave off, cease, pause" (see intermission). Related: Intermittently.
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