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cease (n.)

"cessation, stopping" (archaic), c. 1300, from cease (n.) or else from Old French cesse "cease, cessation," from cesser.

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desist (v.)

mid-15c., "refrain;" 1520s, "to stop, cease from some action or proceeding," from Latin desistere "to stand aside, leave off, cease," from de "off" (see de-) + sistere "stop, come to a stand," from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Related: Desisted; desisting.

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cease (v.)

c. 1300, cesen, "to stop moving, acting, or speaking; come to an end," from Old French cesser "to come to an end, stop, cease; give up, desist," from Latin cessare "to cease, go slow, give over, leave off, be idle," frequentative of cedere (past participle cessus) "go away, withdraw, yield" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Transitive sense "put a stop to," now rare, is from late 14c. Related: Ceased; ceasing. Old English in this sense had geswican, blinnan.

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cease-fire (n.)

also ceasefire, "a cessation of shooting," 1916, from verbal phrase cease fire, attested from 1847 as a military command (formerly also signaled by bugles), from cease (v.) + fire (n.) in the gunnery sense. Generally two words until after mid-20c.

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surcease (v.)
early 15c., "cease from an action, desist," from Anglo-French surseser, Old French sursis, past participle of surseoir "to refrain, delay," from Latin supersedere "forbear, refrain or desist from" (see supersede). The English spelling with -c- was influenced by the unrelated verb cease. As a noun from 1580s.
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relinquish (v.)

mid-15c., relinquishen, "desert, abandon" (someone, a sense now obsolete); late 15c., "give up the pursuit or practice of, desist, cease from;" from Old French relinquiss-, present-participle stem of relinquir (12c.), from Latin relinquere "leave behind, forsake, abandon, give up," from re- "back" (see re-) + linquere "to leave" (from PIE *linkw-, nasalized form of root *leikw- "to leave").

From 1550s as "give up the possession or occupancy of." Related: Relinquished; relinquishing; relinquishment.

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supersedeas (n.)
writ to stay legal proceedings, Latin, literally "you shall desist," second person singular present subjunctive of supersedere "desist, refrain from, forebear" (see supersede).
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stint (v.)
"to be sparing or frugal," 1722, earlier "to limit, restrain" (1510s), "cause to cease, put an end to" (mid-14c.), "cease, desist" (intransitive), c. 1200, from Old English styntan "to blunt, make dull, stupefy" probably originally "make short," from Proto-Germanic *stuntijanan, from PIE *steud-, extended form of root *(s)teu- (1) "to push, stick, knock, beat" (see steep (adj.)).

The Old English verb is cognate with Old Norse stytta (assimilated from earlier *stynta) "to shorten, make short, tuck up;" and the modern sense of the English word might be from Old Norse or from an unrecorded Old English sense. Related to stunt (v.) and stutter (v.). Sense of "be careful in expenditure" is from 1848. Related: Stinted; stinting. The noun is attested from c. 1300.
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hands-off (adj.)
by 1895, from verbal phrase; see hand (n.) + off (adv.). Hands off! as a command to desist is by 1810.
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plateau (v.)

"enter a period of stability or stagnation, cease to rise," 1952, from plateau (n.). Related: Plateaued; plateauing.

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