Etymology
Advertisement
Celia 
fem. proper name, from Italian Celia, from Latin Caelia, fem. of Caelius, name of a Roman gens. Sheila is a variant.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Cecilia 
fem. proper name, fem. of Cecil (q.v.).
Related entries & more 
Cepheid (n.)

type of variable star, 1904, from Delta Cephi, the name of the first such star identified, which is in the constellation Cepheus. With -id.

Related entries & more 
Celtic (adj.)

also Keltic, 1650s, in archaeology and history, "pertaining to the (ancient) Celts," from French Celtique or Latin Celticus "pertaining to the Celts" (see Celt). In reference to the language group including Irish, Gaelic, Welsh, Breton, etc., from 1707. Of modern peoples or their other qualities, by mid-19c. The Boston basketball team was founded 1946. Celtic twilight is from Yeats's name for his collection of adapted Irish folk tales (1893).

Related entries & more 
Ceres 

Roman goddess of agriculture (identified with Greek Demeter), also the name given to the first-found and largest asteroid (discovered 1801 by Piazzi at Palermo), from PIE *ker-es-, from root *ker- (2) "to grow." Her festival, Cerealia, was April 10.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Cepheus 

ancient, dim northern constellation, mid-15c., Cephe, from Latin Cepheus, from Greek Kepheus, name of a mythical king of Ethiopia, husband of Cassiopeia, father of Andromeda.

Related entries & more 
Cerberus 

"watch-dog guardian of Hades," late 14c., Latinized form of Greek Kerberos, which is of unknown origin, according to Klein it is perhaps cognate with Sanskrit karbarah, sabalah "spotted, speckled;" Sabalah was the name of one of the two dogs of Yama. Usually represented with three heads.

Related entries & more 
Celeste 
fem. proper name, from French céleste (11c.) "sky, heaven," from Latin caelestis "heavenly" (see celestial).
Related entries & more 
Cetus 

ancient southern constellation, from Latin, from Greek kētos "whale; large fish; sea-monster," a word of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
Cedric 
masc. proper name, modern, apparently introduced by Sir Walter Scott (Cedric the Saxon is a character in "Ivanhoe"); apparently a mistake for Old English name Cerdic.
Related entries & more