Etymology
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capacity (n.)

early 15c., capacite, "ability to contain; size, extent;" also "ability" in a legal, moral, or intellectual sense, from Old French capacité "ability to hold" (15c.), from Latin capacitatem (nominative capacitas) "breadth, capacity, capability of holding much," noun of state from capax (genitive capacis) "able to hold much," from capere "to take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").

The sense of "power to store electricity" is from 1777; the industrial sense of "ability to produce" is from 1931. The meaning "power of containing a certain quantity" is from 1885, hence "largest audience a place can hold" (1908).

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card-carrying (adj.)

"confirmed, thoroughgoing," 1947, originally of labor union memberships, from card (n.1) + present participle of carry (v.). Used frequently during Cold War in U.S. in reference to official membership in the communist party.

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tonnage (n.)

early 15c., "tax or duty on wine imported in tuns," from ton (n.1) + -age, and from Old French tonnage "duty levied on wine in casks" (c. 1300). Meaning "carrying capacity of a ship" is from 1718.

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carry (n.)

c. 1600, "vehicle for carrying," from carry (v.). From 1880 as "the act or an act of carrying." U.S. football sense "an instance of carrying the ball" is attested by 1949.

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cargo (n.)

1650s, "freight loaded on a ship," from Spanish cargo "burden," from cargar "to load, impose taxes," from Late Latin carricare "to load a wagon or cart," from Latin carrus "wagon" (see car).

The French cognate yielded English charge (n.); also compare cark. South Pacific cargo cult is from 1949. Cargo pants is attested from 1977, "loose-fitting casual pants with large pockets on the thighs;" they were named for the cargo pocket (by 1944), originally on military pants, so called for its carrying capacity.

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capacitance (n.)

"ability to store an electric charge," 1893, from capacity + -ance.

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fulfillment (n.)

1775, "a filling or carrying out, completion;" see fulfill + -ment.

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paramedical (adj.)

"related to medicine in an auxiliary capacity," 1908, from para- (1) "subsidiary" + medical (adj.).

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liter (n.)

unit of capacity in the metric system, 1797, from French litre (1793), from litron, name of an obsolete French measure of capacity for grain (16c.), from Medieval Latin litra, from Greek litra "pound" (unit of weight), which apparently is from the same Sicilian Italic source as Latin libra (see Libra).

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maneuverability (n.)

also maneuvrability, "capacity for being maneuvered," especially of automobiles and aircraft, 1914, from maneuverable + -ity.

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