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car (n.)
c. 1300, "wheeled vehicle," from Anglo-French carre, Old North French carre, from Vulgar Latin *carra, related to Latin carrum, carrus (plural carra), originally "two-wheeled Celtic war chariot," from Gaulish karros, a Celtic word (compare Old Irish and Welsh carr "cart, wagon," Breton karr "chariot"), from PIE *krsos, from root *kers- "to run."

"From 16th to 19th c. chiefly poetic, with associations of dignity, solemnity, or splendour ..." [OED]. Used in U.S. by 1826 of railway freight carriages and of passenger coaches on a railway by 1830; by 1862 of streetcars or tramway cars. Extension to "automobile" is by 1896, but from 1831 to the first decade of 20c. the cars meant "railroad train." Car bomb first attested 1972, in reference to Northern Ireland. The Latin word also is the source of Italian and Spanish carro, French char.
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flat-car (n.)
1839 in railroading, from flat (adj.) + car (n.).
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hand-car (n.)
1846 in railroading sense, from hand (n.) + car.
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car-wash (n.)
also carwash, by 1924, "act of washing an automobile," also "commercial establishment where an automobile can be washed," from car (n.) + wash (n.).
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street-car (n.)
"passenger car for city travel," horse-drawn at first, later cable-powered, 1859, American English, from street (n.) + car (n.).
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cable-car (n.)
"car on a cable railroad," 1879, from cable (n.) + car. A streetcar moved by an endless cable which is cased in a small tunnel under the railway and kept in motion by a remote stationary engine.
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stock-car (n.)
racing car with a basic chassis of an ordinary commercially produced vehicle, 1914, American English, from stock (n.2) + car. Earlier "a railroad car used to transport livestock" (1858).
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car-sick (adj.)
also carsick, "dizzy and nauseated from the motion of an automobile," 1908, from car (n.) + sick (adj.). Earlier it was used in the sense of "sick from the motion of a railroad car." Related: Car-sickness.
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car-pool (n.)
also carpool, "the sharing of a car ride by more than one person going to the same destination," 1942, American English, from car + pool (n.2). As a verb from 1962. Related: Carpooled; carpooling.
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