Etymology
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Samothrace 

Aegean island, from Samos + Thrace, representing the sources of two waves of settlers who came to the island in ancient times. Related: Samothracian.

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Kampuchea 
name taken by Cambodia after the communist takeover in 1975, representing a local pronunciation of the name that came into English as Cambodia. Related: Kampuchean.
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-ial 
adjectival word-forming element, variant of -al (1) with connective -i-. From Latin -ialis, in which the -i- originally was from the stem of the word being attached but later came to be felt as connective.
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brief (n.)

early 14c., bref, "a writing issued by authority," from Latin breve (genitive brevis), noun derivative of adjective brevis "short, little" (from PIE root *mregh-u- "short") which came to mean "letter, summary," specifically a letter of the pope (less ample and solemn than a bull), and thus came to mean "letter of authority," which yielded the modern, legal sense of "systematic summary of the facts of a case" (1630s). Sense of "a short or concise writing" is from 1560s. In German, Brief has become the general word for "an epistle or letter."

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gasometer (n.)
1790, from gas (n.1) + -meter. Originally an instrument for measuring gases; as this also involves collecting and storing them, it came also to be used for "a storehouse for gas." Related: Gasometric; gasometry.
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pother (n.)

1590s, "disturbance, commotion," a word of unknown origin. Meaning "mental trouble" is from 1640s; verb sense of "to fluster" is attested from 1690s. According to OED originally rhyming with other, brother; the pronunciation shift came in 19c. by influence of bother.

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boyar (n.)
member of a Russian aristocratic class, 1590s, from Russian boyarin (plural boyare), perhaps from boji "struggle," or from Slavic root *bol- "great." Originally a title (abolished by Peter the Great) of officials, it came to signify the Russian aristocracy generally.
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pillbox (n.)
also pill-box, "box for holding pills," 1730, from pill (n.) + box (n.). As a small round concrete machine gun nest, it came into use in World War I. As a type of hat, attested from 1958.
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Anglian (adj.)
"of the Angles; of East Anglia," 1726; see Angle. The Old English word was Englisc, but as this came to be used in reference to the whole Germanic people of Britain, a new word was wanted to describe this branch of them.
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