Etymology
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cark (v.)
"to be weighed down or oppresssed by cares or worries, be concerned about" (archaic), early 12c., a figurative use, via Anglo-French from Old North French carkier "to load, burden," from Late Latin carcare "to load a wagon or cart," from Latin carrus "wagon" (see car). Compare Old North French carguer "charger," corresponding to Old French chargier. The literal sense in English, "to load, put a burden on," is from c. 1300. Related: Carked; carking.

Also as a noun in Middle English and after, "charge, responsibility; anxiety, worry; burden on the mind or spirit," (c. 1300), from Anglo-French karke, from Old North French form of Old French carche, variant of charge "load, burden, imposition" (source of charge (n.)).
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Carl 
masc. proper name, from continental sources such as Danish Carl, Middle High German Karl, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). The Carlists in 19c. Spain were partisans of Don Carlos de Borbon.
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carl (n.)

c. 1300, "bondsman; common man, man of low birth," from Old Norse karl "man" (as opposed to "woman"), "male, freeman," from Proto-Germanic *karlon- (source also of Dutch karel "a fellow," Old High German karl "a man, husband"). The same Proto-Germanic source produced Old English ceorl "man of low degree" (see churl) and the masc. proper name Carl and, via French and Latin, Charles.

The Mellere was a stout carle for the nones [Chaucer]
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Carla 
fem. proper name, fem. of Carl.
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Carlisle 
city in Cumberland, western England, c. 100, Carleol, with Celtic cair "fortified town" + the earlier name, Lugovalio (4c.), from a Celtic proper name *Luguvalos.
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Carlos 
masc. proper name, Spanish form of the Germanic masculine proper name (Karl) that is represented in Italian by Carlo, in French by Charles.
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Carlovingian (adj.)
"Carolingian," 1781, from French Carlovingien, an alteration of Carolingien (see Carolingian) on model of Mérovingien (see Merovingian).
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Carmel 
mountain in northern Israel, from Latin Carmel, from Greek Karmel, from Hebrew karmel "garden, fertile field."
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Carmelite (n.)
member of an order of mendicant friars (also White Friars) founded 12c. by Berthold of Calabria on Mount Carmel overlooking the bay of Acre in what is now northwestern Israel; mid-15c., from Medieval Latin Carmelites. The order as re-established in 16c. Spain by St. Theresa had both monks and nuns.
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