Etymology
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caribou (n.)
also cariboo, "American reindeer," 1660s, from Canadian French caribou, from Micmac (Algonquian) kaleboo or a related Algonquian name, literally "pawer, scratcher," from its kicking snow aside to feed on moss and grass.
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caricature (n.)

"grotesque or ludicrous representation of persons or things by an absurd exaggeration of what is characteristic," 1748 (figurative), 1750 (literal), from French caricature (18c.), from Italian caricatura "satirical picture; an exaggeration," literally "an overloading," from caricare "to load; exaggerate," from Vulgar Latin *carricare "to load a wagon or cart," from Latin carrus "two-wheeled wagon" (see car). The Italian form had been used in English from 1680s and was common 18c.

A representation, pictorial or descriptive, in which beauties or favorable points are concealed or perverted and peculiarities or defects exaggerated, so as to make the person or thing represented ridiculous, while a general likeness is retained. [Century Dictionary]
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caricature (v.)
"make or draw a caricature of," 1749, from caricature (n.). Related: Caricatured; caricaturing.
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caricaturist (n.)
"one who draws or writes caricatures," 1754, from caricature (n.) + -ist.
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caries (n.)

1630s, "destructive disease of bone," from Latin caries "rottenness, decay," from Proto-Italic *kas-, usually said to be from PIE root *kere- "to injure, break apart" (source also of Greek ker "death, destruction," Old Irish krin "withered, faded"). Related: Carious. But de Vaan writes that "semantically, caries may just as well belong to careocared 'to lack' as 'defect, state of defectiveness' ...." Of teeth by 1826.

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carillon (n.)
"set of tuned, stationary bells sounded by means of a keyboard or other machinery," 1775, from French carillon, which, according to French sources, is from Old French carignon "set of four bells," an alteration of quarregon, from Vulgar Latin *quadrinionem, from Latin quaternionem "set of four," from quater "four times," from PIE *kwetrus, from root *kwetwer- "four."
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caring (adj.)
"compassionate, attentive to the weak, sick, etc.," 1966, present-participle adjective from care (v.). Related: Caringly; caringness.
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caring (n.)
1550s, verbal noun from care (v.).
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Carinthia 
region of southern Austria, named for the people who once lived there, whose own name might reflect the Alpine landscape and be from a Pre-Indo-European *karra "rock." Related: Carinthian.
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carious (adj.)
"decayed" (of tooth or bone), 1670s, from French carieux (16c.), from Latin cariosus "full of decay," from caries "rottenness, decay" (see caries). Extended sense of "having a corroded appearance" is by 1832.
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