Etymology
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capo (n.1)
"leader of a Mafia 'family,' " 1952, Italian, literally "head," from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head").
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capo (n.2)
"pitch-altering device for a stringed instrument," 1946, short for capo tasto (1876), from Italian, literally "head stop," from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head") + tasto "key; touch."
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capoeira (n.)

Brazilian dance-based martial arts form, by 1922, from Brazilian Portuguese. Said to be from Tupi ka'a "forest" + pau "round," referring to the scrubby areas in the Brazilian interior where fugitive slaves would hide.

Capoeira: second growth of vegetation after land has been cleared. Also applied to kind of basket made of native grass; also to the Brazilian equivalent to jiu-jit-su; genuine capoeira adepts have remarkable muscular control. The term capoeira is also applied to a certain dance. [L.E. Elliott, "Brazil Today and Tomorrow," New York" 1922]
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capon (n.)
"a castrated cock," late Old English capun, from Latin caponem (nominative capo) "castrated cock" (also source of French chapon, Spanish capon, Italian cappone), perhaps from a verb meaning "to strike off," from PIE root *(s)kep- "to cut" (see hatchet (n.)). Probably reinforced in Middle English by cognate Old North French capon.
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capote (n.)
"large cloak with a hood," 1812, from French capote, fem. of capot (17c.), diminutive of cape (see cape (n.1)).
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Cappadocia (n.)
ancient name of a province and kingdom of Asia Minor, roughly corresponding to modern Turkey, from Greek Kappadokía, perhaps ultimately from Persian Hvaspadakhim "land of fine horses." In ancient Athens, Cappadocians were notorious as knaves and cowards, but the region's horses were celebrated.
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cappuccino (n.)
"espresso coffee with steamed milk foam," 1948, from Italian cappuccino, from Capuchin in reference to the beverage's color, which supposedly resembles to that of the brown hoods of the Friars Minor Capuchins (see Capuchin).
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Capri 
island in the Bay of Naples, a name of unknown origin: Latin capra "she-goat," Greek kapros "boar," Etruscan capra "burial place" all have been suggested. As a type of wine, 1877; as a type of pants, 1956 (said to have been designed c. 1948); so called perhaps because they were first popular in Capri, which was emerging as a European holiday destination about this time (compare Bermuda shorts). Related: capris "capri pants" (1966).
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Capri pants 
1956 (said to have been designed c. 1948), from Capri, Italian island; so called perhaps because they were first popular in Capri, which was emerging as a European holiday destination about this time (compare Bermuda shorts).
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