Etymology
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Cape Cod 
peninsula of New England, named 1602 by English navigator Bartholomew Gosnold for the abundance of fish his men caught there (see cod). In reference to houses reminiscent of New England architecture, from 1916.
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capeesh 
variant spelling of capiche (q.v.).
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Capella 
bright northern star (fifth brightest in the heavens), the alpha of the constellation Auriga, by 17c., from Latin capella, literally "little she-goat" (Greek kinesai kheimonas), diminutive of capra "she-goat," fem. of caper "goat" (see cab).
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caper (n.1)
type of prickly Mediterranean bush, also in reference to the plant's edible buds, late 14c., from Latin capparis (source of Italian cappero, French câpre, German Kaper), from Greek kapparis "the caper plant or its fruit," which is of uncertain origin. Arabic kabbar, Persian kabar are from Greek. Perhaps reborrowed into English 16c. The final -s was mistaken for a plural inflection in English and dropped.
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caper (v.)
"to leap, skip, prance," 1580s, apparently short for obsolete capriole "to leap, skip," which is probably from Italian capriolare "jump in the air" (see cab). Related: Capered; capering.
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caper (n.2)

by 1590s, "a playful leap or jump, a skip or spring as in dancing," from caper (v.). Meaning "prank" is from 1840 via notion of "sportive action;" that of "crime" is from 1926. To cut capers "dance in a frolicsome way" is from c. 1600, from cut (v.) in the sense of "perform, execute."

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Capetian (adj.)

1802, "pertaining to or related to the descendants of Hugh Capet, founder of the French dynasty which succeeded the Carolingians in 987.

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capias (n.)
writ of arrest issued by a court in a civil action, mid-15c., from Latin capias, literally "thou mayest take" (typical first word of such a writ); 2nd person singular present subjunctive of capere "to catch, seize, hold" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").
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capiche (interj.)
"do you understand?" 1940s slang, from Italian capisci? "do you understand?" from capire "to understand," from Latin capere "seize, grasp, take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp"). Also spelled coppish, kabish, capeesh, etc.
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capillarity (n.)
"state or condition of being capillary," 1806, from French capillarité, from Latin capillaris, literally "of hair" (see capillary).
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