Etymology
Advertisement
calyx (n.)

"outer part of the perianth of a flower," 1680s, from Latin calyx, from Greek kalyx "seed pod, husk, outer covering" (of a fruit, flower bud, etc.), from stem of kalyptein "to cover, conceal," from PIE root *kel- (1) "to cover, conceal, save." The Latin plural is calyces. Some sources connect the word rather with Greek kylix "drinking cup" (see chalice).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
calzone (n.)

type of Italian stuffed turnover, a specialty of Naples, Italian, literally "trouser leg," so called for the resemblance.

Related entries & more 
cam (n.1)

1777, "a projecting part of a rotating machinery used to impart motion to another part," from Dutch cam "cog of a wheel," originally "comb," from Proto-Germanic *kambaz "comb," from PIE root *gembh- "tooth, nail." It is thus a cognate of English comb (n.). This might have combined with English camber "having a slight arch;" or the whole thing could be from camber.

It converts regular rotary motion into irregular, fast-and-slow rotary or reciprocal motion. "The original method was by cogs or teeth fixed or cut at certain points in the circumference or disc of a wheel ..." [OED]. Cam-shaft attested from 1850.

Related entries & more 
camaraderie (n.)

"companionship, good-fellowship," 1840, from French camaraderie, from camarade "comrade" (see comrade).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
camber (n.)

"convexity on an upper surface," 1610s, nautical term, from Old French cambre, chambre "bent," from Latin camurum (nominative camur) "crooked, arched;" related to camera. As a verb, "become slightly arched," from 1620s. Related: Cambered; cambering.

Related entries & more 
cambium (n.)

1670s in botany, "layer of tissue between the wood and the bark," from Late Latin cambium "exchange," from Latin cambiare "change" (see change (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Cambodia 

Southeast Asian nation, the name is said to be from Kambu, legendary ancestor of the people. Related: Cambodian.

Related entries & more 
Cambrian (adj.)

1650s, "from or of Wales or the Welsh," from Cambria, variant of Cumbria, Latinized derivation of Cymry, the name of the Welsh for themselves, from Old Celtic Combroges "compatriots." The geological sense (in reference to Paleozoic rocks first studied in Wales and Cumberland) is from 1836.

Related entries & more 
cambric (n.)

type of thin, fine linen, late 14c., from Dutch Kamerijk or Flemish Kameryk, Germanic forms of French Cambrai, name of the city in northern France where the cloth was said to have been first manufactured. The modern form of the English word has elements from both versions of the name. The place-name is from Latin Camaracum, according to Room from the personal name Camarus, "itself apparently from Latin cammarus 'a crawfish, prawn' .... It is not known who this was."

Related entries & more 

Page 21