Etymology
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builder (n.)
late 13c., agent noun from build (v.).
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body-builder (n.)

by 1916 as "one devoted to cultivating fitness and strength," from body (n.) + builder. Used earlier in reference to healthful nutriments and coach-body makers. Related: Body-building (by 1892, perhaps 1881, in the "training for physical strength and fitness" sense, said to have been coined by R. J. Roberts, superintendent of the Boston Y.M.C.A. gymnasium).

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wainwright (n.)
"wagon-builder," Old English wægn-wyrhta; see wain + wright.
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biggen (v.)
1640s, "to make big, increase," also "grow big, become larger," from big (adj.) + -en (1). As a noun, bigger is attested from mid-15c. for "builder."
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Steinway (n.)
make of pianos, from Henry Englehard Steinway (1797-1871), celebrated German piano-builder who founded the firm in New York in 1853.
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architect (n.)
Origin and meaning of architect

"person skilled in the art of building, one who plans and designs buildings and supervises their construction," 1560s, from French architecte, from Latin architectus, from Greek arkhitekton "master builder, director of works," from arkhi- "chief" (see archon) + tekton "builder, carpenter," from PIE root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate."

Old English used heahcræftiga "high-crafter" as a loan-translation of Latin architectus. Middle English had architectour "superintendent." Extended sense of "one who plans or contrives" anything is from 1580s.

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architectonic (adj.)
1640s (architectonical is from 1590s), "pertaining to architecture," from Latin architectonicus, from Greek arkhitektonikos "pertaining to a master builder," from arkhitekton "chief workman" (see architect). Metaphysical sense, "pertaining to systematization of knowledge," is from 1801.
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Daedalus 

father of Icarus in Greek mythology, builder of the Cretan labyrinth, from Latin Daedelus, from Greek Daidalos, literally "the cunning worker," from or related to daidallein "to work artfully, embellish," a word of disputed etymology. Beekes writes, "we should consider Pre-Greek origin." Related: Daedalian.

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architecture (n.)

1560s, "the art of building, tasteful application of scientific and traditional rules of good construction to the materials at hand," from French architecture, from Latin architectura, from architectus "master builder, chief workman" (see architect). Meaning "buildings constructed architecturally" is from 1610s.

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developer (n.)

1833, "one who or that which develops," agent noun from develop. Photography use in reference to the chemical bath used to bring out the latent image is attested from 1869; meaning "speculative builder" is by 1938.

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