Etymology
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bud (n.)

"undeveloped growth-point of a plant," late 14c., budde, a word of unknown origin, perhaps from Old French boter "push forward, thrust," itself a Germanic word (compare Dutch bot "bud," Old Saxon budil "bag, purse," German Beutel), or perhaps from Old English budd "beetle."

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bud (v.)

"put forth or produce buds," c. 1400; see bud (n.). Related: Budded; budding.

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bud 

familiar form of address for a male, 1851, perhaps a shortening of buddy (q.v.) and ultimately from brother.

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budding (adj.)

1560s, "sprouting, putting forth or producing buds," present-participle adjective from bud (v.). The figurative sense of "being in an early stage of growth" is from 1580s.

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rosebud (n.)

the bud of a rose, the flower of a rose before it blooms," c. 1500, from rose (n.1) + bud (n.). Hence, "young girl in her first bloom, a debutante."

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inoculate (v.)

mid-15c., "implant a bud into a plant," from Latin inoculatus, past participle of inoculare "graft in, implant a bud or eye of one plant into another," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + oculus "bud," originally "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Meaning "implant germs of a disease to produce immunity" is from inoculation, originally in reference to smallpox, after 1799, often used in sense of "to inoculate with a vaccine." Related: Inoculated; inoculating.

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bub (n.1)

also bubby, familiar address for males, 1839, perhaps a variation of bud "a little boy" (1848), American English colloquial; perhaps from German bube "boy." But sometimes, along with bud, assumed to be a corruption of brother (compare buddy, bubba).

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germinal (adj.)

"in the early stages of development," 1808, from Modern Latin germinalis "in the germ," from Latin germen (genitive germinis) "a sprout, bud, sprig, offshoot" (see germ).

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botony (n.)

also bottony, "decoration with buds, knobs, or buttons at the extremities," 1570s, in heraldry, from Old French botoné (Modern French boutonné) "covered with buds," past participle of boutonner "to bud," from bouton "bud, button," 12c., from bouter "to strike, push," from Frankish or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *buttan, from PIE root *bhau- "to strike."

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gem (v.)

c. 1600, "to adorn with gems;" earlier (mid-12c.) "to bud," from gem (n.). Related: Gemmed; gemming.

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