Etymology
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bub (n.1)
also bubby, familiar address for males, 1839, perhaps a variation of bud "a little boy" (1848), American English colloquial; perhaps from German bube "boy." But sometimes, along with bud, assumed to be a corruption of brother (compare buddy, bubba).
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bub (n.)
"a woman's breast," 1860, short for bubby.
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bub (n.2)
"strong drink of any kind," especially malt liquor, 1670s, perhaps imitative of the sound of drinking.
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grub (n.)
"larva of an insect," early 15c., perhaps from grub (v.) on the notion of "digging insect," or from the possibly unrelated Middle English grub "dwarfish fellow" (c. 1400). Meaning "dull drudge" is 1650s. The slang sense of "food" is first recorded 1650s, said to be from birds eating grubs, but also often linked with bub "drink."
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bubonic (adj.)
"characterized by swelling in the groin," by 1795, from Latin bubo (genitive bubonis) "swelling of lymph glands" (in the groin), from Greek boubon "the groin; swelling in the groin" (which is of unknown origin) + -ic. Bubonic plague attested by 1827.
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bubby (n.)
"a woman's breast," 1680s, of uncertain origin. Compare boobs.
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bubble (n.)

"small vesicle of water or some other fluid inflated with air or gas," early 14c., perhaps from Middle Dutch bobbel (n.) and/or Middle Low German bubbeln (v.), all probably of echoic origin. Figurative use in reference to anything wanting firmness, substance, or permanence is from 1590s. Specifically in reference to inflated markets or financial schemes originally in South Sea Bubble, which originated c. 1711 and collapsed 1720. Bubble-bath recorded by 1937. Bubble-shell is from 1847.

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bubble-gum (n.)
1935, from bubble (n.) + gum (n.). Figurative of young teenager tastes or culture from the early 1960s.
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