Etymology
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brusque (adj.)
in older use also brusk, "abrupt in manner, rude," 1650s, from French brusque "lively, fierce," from Italian adjective brusco "sharp, tart, rough," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bruscum "butcher's broom plant," from Late Latin brucus "heather," from Gaulish *bruko- (compare Breton brug "heath," Old Irish froech). Related: Brusquely; brusqueness.
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brisk (adj.)
"quick or rapid in action or motion, swift, lively," 1550s, as Scottish bruisk, which is of uncertain origin; perhaps an alteration of French brusque (see brusque). Related: Briskly; briskness.
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terse (adj.)

1590s (implied in tersely), "clean-cut, burnished, neat," from French ters "clean," and directly from Latin tersus "wiped off, clean, neat," from past participle of tergere "to rub, polish, wipe," which is of uncertain origin. Sense of "concise or pithy in style or language" is from 1777, which led to a general sense of "neatly concise." The pejorative meaning "brusque" is a fairly recent development. Related: Terseness.

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