Etymology
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bronze (n.)

1721, "alloy of copper and (usually) a smaller amount of tin," from French bronze, from Italian bronzo, from Medieval Latin bronzium, which is of uncertain origin. Perhaps cognate (via notion of color) with Venetian bronza "glowing coals," or German brunst "fire." Perhaps influenced by Latin Brundisium the Italian town of Brindisi (Pliny writes of aes Brundusinum). Perhaps ultimately from Persian birinj "copper."

In Middle English, the distinction between bronze (copper-tin alloy) and brass (copper-zinc alloy) was not clear, and both were called bras (see brass (n.)). Used historically for bells, cannons, statuary, and fine mechanical works. Also from French are Dutch brons, German Bronze, etc., and ultimately from the Medieval Latin word are Spanish bronce, Russian bronza, Polish bronc, Albanian brunze, etc.

A bronze medal has been given to a third-place finisher at least since 1852. The archaeological Bronze Age (1850) falls between the Stone and Iron ages, and is a reference to the principal material for making weapons and ornaments.

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age (n.)

late 13c., "long but indefinite period in human history," from Old French aage, eage (12c., Modern French âge) "age; life, lifetime, lifespan; maturity," earlier edage (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *aetaticum (source also of Spanish edad, Italian eta, Portuguese idade "age"), extended form of Latin aetatem (nominative aetas), "period of life, age, lifetime, years," from aevum "lifetime, eternity, age," from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity"

Expelled native eld (Old English eald) "old age; an age; age as a period of life." Meaning "time something has lived, particular length or stage of life" is from early 14c. Used especially for "old age" since early 14c.; meaning "effects of old age" (feebleness, senility, etc.) is from mid-15c. In geology, in reference to great periods in the history of the earth, 1855; in archaeology, from 1865 (Stone Age, etc.) naming periods for the materials employed for weapons and tools. Sometimes in early modern English "a century" (similar to French siècle "century," literally "an age"), hence plural use in Dark Ages, Middle Ages. To act (one's) age "behave with appropriate maturity" is attested by 1927.

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bronze (v.)
1640s, "give the color or appearance of bronze to," from French bronzer (16c.) or else from bronze (n.). Figuratively, of feelings, hearts, etc., "to harden like bronze," 1726. Meaning "to make to be brown or bronze in color" (by exposure to the sun, etc.) is from 1792. Related: Bronzed; bronzing.
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age (v.)
late 14c., "grow old," from age (n.). Transitive meaning "make old" is early 15c.
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age-group (n.)
1876, originally a term in the science of demographics, from age (n.) + group (n.).
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over-age (adj.)

that is over a certain age," "1886, from over- + age (n.). Related: Over-aged (n.) "those who are too old" (late 15c.).

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Minoan (adj.)

"of or pertaining to ancient Crete," 1894, from Minos, famous king of Crete; applied by British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans to the Bronze Age civilization that flourished there c. 3000-1400 B.C.E.

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bell-metal (n.)
"alloy used in making cast bells," 1540s, from bell (n.) + metal (n.). Typically copper and tin, with a higher proportion of tin than usual in bronze.
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gun-metal (n.)
type of bronze or other alloy formerly used in the manufacture of light cannons (since superseded by steel), 1540s, from gun (n.) + metal. Used attributively of a dull blue-gray color since 1905.
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