Etymology
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bride (n.)

"woman newly married or about to be," Old English bryd "bride, betrothed or newly married woman," from Proto-Germanic *bruthiz "woman being married" (source also of Old Frisian breid, Dutch bruid, Old High German brut, German Braut "bride"), a word of uncertain origin.

Gothic cognate bruþs, however, meant "daughter-in-law," and the form of the word borrowed from Old High German into Medieval Latin (bruta) and Old French (bruy) had only this sense. In ancient Indo-European custom, the married woman went to live with her husband's family, thus the sole "newly wed female" in such a household would have been the daughter-in-law. On the same notion, some trace the word itself to the PIE verbal root *bhreu-, which forms words for cooking and brewing, as this likely was the daughter-in-law's job. An Old Frisian word for "bride" was fletieve, literally "house-gift."

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price (n.)

c. 1200, pris, "non-monetary value, worth; praise," later "recompense, prize, reward," also "sum or amount of money which a seller asks or obtains for goods in market" (mid-13c.), from Old French pris "price, value, wages, reward," also "honor, fame, praise, prize" (Modern French prix), from Late Latin precium, from Latin pretium "reward, prize, value, worth" (from PIE *pret-yo-, suffixed form of *pret-, extended form of root *per- (5) "to traffic in, to sell").

Praise, price, and prize began to diverge in Old French, with praise emerging in Middle English by early 14c. and prize, with the -z- spelling, evident by late 1500s. Having shed the extra Old French and Middle English senses, price again has the ancient sense of the Latin original. To set (or put) a price on someone, "offer a reward for capture" is from 1766.

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price (v.)

"to set the price of," late 15c. (from late 14c. in the sense that has gone with praise (v.)), from price (n.) or a variant of prize (v.) or from Old French prisier, a variant of preisier "to value, estimate; to praise." See price (n.). Related: Priced; pricing.

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price-tag (n.)

"tag or ticket affixed to something and indicating its price," 1878, from price (n.) + tag (n.).

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prix fixe 

meal served at a fixed price, 1883, French, literally "fixed price" (see price (n.) and fix (v.)).

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bridal (adj.)

"belonging to a bride or a wedding," c. 1200, transferred use of noun bridal "wedding feast," Old English brydealo "marriage feast," from bryd ealu, literally "bride ale" (see bride + ale); the second element later was confused with suffix -al (1), especially after c. 1600. Compare scot-ale under scot (n.) and Middle English scythe-ale (mid-13c.) "drinking celebration for mowers, as compensation for a particular job." Bridal-suite is by 1857.

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priceless (adj.)

"having a value beyond price, invaluable," 1590s, from price (n.) + -less. Compare worthless, which has the opposite sense. Colloquial sense of "delightful, amusing" is attested from 1907. Related: Pricelessly; pricelessness.

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mark-down (n.)

"reduction in price," 1880, from the verbal expression mark down "reduce in price" (1859), from mark (v.) in the sense of "put a numerical price on an object for sale" + down (adv.). Mark down as "make a note of" is by 1881.

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worth (n.)

Old English weorþ "value, price, price paid; worth, worthiness, merit; equivalent value amount, monetary value," from worth (adj.). From c. 1200 as "excellence, nobility."

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