Etymology
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boyish (adj.)
1540s, "pertaining to boys," from boy + -ish. Meaning "puerile" is from 1570s. Related: Boyishly; boyishness.
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Eton 
collar (1882), jacket (1873, formerly worn by the younger boys there), etc., from Eton College, public school for boys on the Thames opposite Windsor, founded by Henry VI. The place name is Old English ea "river" (see ea) + tun "farm, settlement" (see town (n.)). Related: Etonian.
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pederast (n.)

"one who commits pederasty," 1730s, from French pédéraste, from Latin paederasta, from Greek paiderastēs "a lover of boys" (see pederasty).

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choir-boy (n.)

also choir boy, "member of a boys' choir," 1769, from choir + boy. As a type of innocence, by 1885.

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pederasty (n.)

"carnal union of males with males," especially "sodomy of a man with a boy," c. 1600, from French pédérastie or directly from Modern Latin pæderastia, from Greek paiderastia "love of boys," from paiderastēs "pederast, lover of boys," from pais (genitive paidos) "child, boy" (see pedo-) + erastēs "lover," from erasthai "to love" (see Eros). Related: Pederastic.

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sirrah 
1520s, term of address used to men or boys expressing anger or contempt, archaic extended form of sir (in U.S., siree, attested from 1823).
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pedagogy (n.)

"the science of teaching," 1580s, from French pédagogie (16c.), from Latin paedagogia, from Greek paidagōgia "education, attendance on boys," from paidagōgos "teacher" (see pedagogue).

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Steven 
masc. proper name, Englished form of Stephen (q.v.). A top 20 name for boys born in the U.S. between 1949 and 1976; the -ph- form was the more popular in U.S. until 1960s.
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Ernest 

masc. proper name, from French Ernest, which is of German origin (compare Old High German Ernust, German Ernst), literally "earnestness" (see earnest (adj.)). Among the top 50 names for boys born in U.S. from 1880 through 1933.

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putti (n.)

"representations of cupid-like nude children common in old art (15c. and after, originally in Italy), 1640s, from Italian putti "small boys," plural of putto, from Latin putus "boy, child" (see puerility).

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