Etymology
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bought 
past tense and past participle of buy (v.).
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buy (v.)

Old English bycgan (past tense bohte) "get by paying for, acquire the possession of in exchange for something of like value; redeem, ransom; procure; get done," from Proto-Germanic *bugjan (source also of Old Saxon buggjan, Old Norse byggja, Gothic bugjan), which is of unknown origin and not found outside Germanic.

The surviving spelling is southwest England dialect; the word was generally pronounced in Old English and Middle English with a -dg- sound as "budge," or "bidge." Meaning "believe, accept as true" is attested by 1926. Related: Bought; buying. To buy time "prevent further deterioration but make no improvement" is attested from 1946.

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boughten (adj.)

irregular past participle of buy, used as an adjective from 1793, especially in colloquial U.S. usage, of clothing and other items, opposed to "made."

BOUGHTEN. Which is bought. This is a common word in the interior of New England and New York. It is applied to articles purchased from the shops, to distinguish them from similar articles of home manufacture. [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]
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venality (n.)
1610s, from French vénalité or directly from Late Latin venalitatem (nominative venalitas) "capability of being bought," from Latin venalis "capable of being bought" (see venal).
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emption (n.)

late 15c., "purchase," from Latin emptionem (nominative emptio) "a buying, purchasing; thing bought," noun of action from emptus, past-participle of emere "to buy" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute").

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self-assembly (n.)

"subsequent assembly of something bought in kit form" (furniture, etc.), by 1966; see self- + assembly

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grab-bag (n.)
"miscellaneous mixture," 1867, originally the name of a carnival game (1854) consisting of a bag full of items to be obtained by thrusting the hand within, the privilege of doing so having previously been bought; from grab + bag (n.).
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Izod 

clothing manufacturer trendy in the 1970s and 1980s, the company name was bought in 1930s from A.J. Izod, a London tailoring establishment. The surname (also Izzard, etc.) goes back to the Middle Ages and might be related to the proper name Isold.

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repossession (n.)

"renewed possession, act or state of possessing again," 1580s; see re- "back, again" + possession. By 1938 in reference to recovery of goods bought on plan by one who then defaulted on payments.

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marketing (n.)

1560s, "buying and selling, act of transacting business in a market," verbal noun from market (v.). Meaning "produce bought or sold at a market" is from 1701. The business sense, "process of moving goods from producer to consumer with emphasis on advertising and sales," is attested by 1897.

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