Etymology
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boil (v.)

early 13c. (intransitive) "to bubble up, be in a state of ebullition," especially from heat, from Old French bolir "boil, bubble up, ferment, gush" (12c., Modern French bouillir), from Latin bullire "to bubble, seethe," from PIE *beu- "to swell" (see bull (n.2)). The native word is seethe. Figurative sense, of passions, feelings, etc., "be in an agitated state" is from 1640s.

I am impatient, and my blood boyls high. [Thomas Otway, "Alcibiades," 1675]

Transitive sense "put into a boiling condition, cause to boil" is from early 14c. The noun is from mid-15c. as "an act of boiling," 1813 as "state of boiling." Related: Boiled; boiling. Boiling point "temperature at which a liquid is converted into vapor" is recorded from 1773.

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boil (n.)
"hard tumor," altered from Middle English bile (Kentish bele), perhaps by association with the verb; from Old English byl, byle "boil, carbuncle," from West Germanic *buljon- "swelling" (source also of Old Frisian bele, Old High German bulia, German Beule). Perhaps ultimately from PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell," or from *beu- "to grow, swell" (see bull (n.2); also compare boast (n.)). Compare Old Irish bolach "pustule," Gothic ufbauljan "to puff up," Icelandic beyla "hump."
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aboil (adj.)
"boiling, on the boil," 1858, from a- + boil (v.).
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boiler (n.)
1540s, "person who boils," agent noun from boil (v.). Meaning "vessel for boiling" is from 1725; specific sense "strong metallic structure in which steam is generated for driving engines" is from 1757.
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hard-boiled (adj.)

also hardboiled, 1723 in reference to eggs, "cooked so long as to be solid," from hard (adj.) + past tense of boil. In transferred sense "severe, tough," from 1886.

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bouillon (n.)
broth or soup from boiled beef or other meat, 1650s, from French bouillon (11c.), noun use of past participle of bouillir "to boil," from Old French bolir (see boil (v.)).
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bouillabaisse (n.)
type of fish chowder, 1845, from French bouillabaisse (19c.), from Provençal bouiabaisso, boulh-abaisso, a compound of two verbs corresponding to English boil (v.) + abase (in the original sense of "to lower").
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ebullient (adj.)
1590s, "boiling," from Latin ebullientem (nominative ebulliens), present participle of ebullire "to boil over," literally or figuratively, from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + bullire "to bubble" (see boil (v.)). Figurative sense of "enthusiastic" is first recorded 1660s.
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potboiler (n.)

also pot-boiler, 1864 in the figurative sense of "literary or artistic work produced hastily and merely for providing the necessities of life," from pot (n.1) + agent noun from boil (v.). The notion is of something one writes solely to "keep the pot boiling," that is, put food on the table.

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bullion (n.)
mid-14c., "uncoined gold or silver," from Anglo-French bullion, Old French billon "bar of precious metal," also "place where coins are made, mint," from Old French bille "stick, block of wood" (see billiards), influenced by Old French boillir "to boil," from Latin bullire "boil" (see boil (v.)), through the notion of "melting."
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