Etymology
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biology (n.)

"the science of life and living things," 1819, from Greek bios "life, one's life, lifetime" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live;" see bio-) + -logy "study of." Suggested 1802 by German naturalist Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus, and introduced as a scientific term that year in French by Lamarck; they seem to have hit upon the word independently.

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sociobiology (n.)
"study of the biological basis of social behavior," 1946, from socio- + biology. Related: Sociobiological.
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astrobiology (n.)
1903, from French astrobiologie; see astro- "star" + biology. Related: Astrobiological; astrobiologist.
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microbiology (n.)

"the science of micro-organisms," 1880, coined in English from micro- + biology. Related: Microbiological.

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biologism (n.)
"interpretation of human life from a strictly biological point of view," 1852; see biology + -ism. Related: Biologistic.
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biologist (n.)
"a student of the science of life," 1813, from biology + -ist. Earliest use is in reference to human life (with the Greek sense of bios); in its modern scientific sense by 1874. Biologian is attested from 1865.
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biological (adj.)
"pertaining to the science of life," 1840, from biology + -ical. Biological clock, "innate mechanism that regulates cyclic activities of living things," is attested from 1955; not especially of human reproductive urges until c. 1991. Biological warfare is from 1946. Related: Biologically. Alternative adjective biologic is from 1850.
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inviable (adj.)
1909, in biology, from in- (1) "not" + viable. Related: Inviability.
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asexuality (n.)
1853, originally in biology; see asexual + -ity.
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