Etymology
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bind (v.)

Old English bindan "to tie up with bonds" (literally and figuratively), also "to make captive; to cover with dressings and bandages" (class III strong verb; past tense band, past participle bunden), from Proto-Germanic *bindanan (source also of Old Saxon bindan, Old Norse and Old Frisian binda, Old High German binten "to bind," German binden, Gothic bindan), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind." Of books, from c. 1400. Intransitive sense of "stick together, cohere" is from 1670s.

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bind (n.)
"anything that binds," in various senses, late Old English, from bind (v.). Meaning "tight or awkward situation" is from 1851.
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bindery (n.)
"place where books are bound," 1793, American English; see bind (v.) + -ery.
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binding (adj.)
late 14c., "serving to bind," past-participle adjective from bind (v.). Meaning "having power to bind" is from 1610s.
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muscle-bound (adj.)
1879, from muscle (n.) + bound, past participle of bind (v.).
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binder (n.)
Old English bindere "one who binds," agent noun from bind (v.). Of various objects or products that bind, from early 16c.
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bine (n.)
"climbing stem, flexible shoot of a shrub," 1727, from a dialectal form of bind (n.).
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spellbound (adj.)
"to be bound by or as if by a spell," 1742, from spell (n.1) + bound (adj.1) "fastened," past participle of bind (v.).
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binding (n.)
mid-13c., "act or action of securing, uniting, etc.," verbal noun from bind (v.). Meaning "thing that binds" is from c. 1300; "state of being bound" is from late 14c. Meaning "covering of a book" is recorded from 1640s.
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woodbine (n.)
Old English wudubinde, a climbing plant, from wudu "wood" (see wood (n.)) + binde "wreath," related to bind (v.). Used of various climbing plants on three continents.
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