Etymology
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biblical (adj.)
1734, "pertaining to the Bible," from Bible + -ical. Related: Biblically. Earlier adjective was Biblic (1680s). Related: Biblicality.
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bibliothec (n.)

also bibliothek, Old English biblioðece "the Bible, the Scriptures," from Latin bibliotheca "library, room for books; collection of books" (in Late Latin and Medieval Latin especially "the Bible"), from Greek bibliothēkē, literally "book-repository," from biblion "book" (see biblio-) + thēkē "case, chest, sheath," from suffixed form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put." Used of the Bible by Jerome and serving as the common Latin word for it until Biblia began to displace it 9c. (see Bible). The word was later reborrowed from French as bibliotheque (16c.).

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bibliotheca (n.)
"the Bible," also "library, place to keep books;" see bibliothec.
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A.V. 
abbreviation of Authorized Version (of the English Bible, 1611) attested from 1868; see authorize.
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bibliolatry (n.)
1763, "worship of books," from biblio- "book" + -latry "worship of." Meaning "worship of the Bible" is from 1847. Related: Bibliolatrist; bibliolatrous.
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exegete (n.)
"one who expounds or interprets a literary production," 1730s, from Greek exegetes "an expounder, interpreter" (especially of the Bible), from exegeisthai (see exegesis).
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scripture (n.)

early 14c., "the sacred writings of the Bible, the books of the Old and New Testaments" (in this sense commonly with a capital); from Medieval Latin and Late Latin scriptura "the writings contained in the Bible, a passage from the Bible," in classical Latin "a writing, character, inscription," from scriptus, past participle of scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

The word in Middle English also could mean "a writing, an act of writing, written characters" (mid-14c.), a sense now rare. The sense of "a passage from the Bible" is by late 14c.  Figuratively, of something assuredly true, it is attested by 1570s. As an adjective, "relating to the Scriptures," by 1720.

Scripturalist for "one who adheres literally to the Scriptures and makes them the foundation of all philosophy" is perhaps by 1725, certainly by 1857; earlier in this sense was scripturarian (1670s), scripturist (1620s). Related: Scripturalism.

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perverted (adj.)

late 14c., in Bible translations, "corrupted, false, turned from the right way," past-participle adjective from pervert (v.). With an implied sexual sense by 1897.

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kitab (n.)
in Islam, "a book," especially the Quran but also the Bible and other sacred books of revealed religions, 1885, from Arabic kitab "book," literally "a writing," from Aramaic kethabh "a writing."
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bibliolator (n.)
also bibliolater, "book-worshipper," 1820, perhaps first in Coleridge, from bibliolatry (q.v.). In later use, especially "one who regards the letter of the Bible with undue respect."
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