Etymology
Advertisement
bib (n.)
linen worn over the breast, especially by children, to keep the front of the dress clean while eating, 1570s, from verb bibben "to drink" (late 14c.), which is perhaps imitative of lip sounds; or else [Skeat] it is from Latin bibere "to drink" (from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink"). If the latter, it is difficult now to say whether this is because it was worn while drinking or because it "soaked up" spills.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bibber (n.)
"drinker, tippler," 1530s, from Middle English bibben (v.) "to drink heartily" (see bib (n.)).
Related entries & more 
*po(i)- 
*pō(i)-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to drink."

It forms all or part of: beer; bever; beverage; bib; bibitory; bibulous; hibachi; imbibe; imbrue; pinocytosis; pirogi; poison; potable; potation; potion; symposium.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit pati "drinks," panam "beverage;" Greek pinein "to drink," poton "that which one drinks," potos "drinking bout;" Latin potare "to drink," potio "a potion, a drinking," also "poisonous draught, magic potion;" Old Church Slavonic piti "to drink," pivo "beverage."
Related entries & more 
beaver (n.2)
"lower face-guard of a helmet," early 15c., from Old French baviere, originally "child's bib," from bave "saliva."
Related entries & more 
overalls (n.)

"loose trousers of a strong material worn by cowboys, etc.," 1782, from over (adv.) + all. Specific sense "loose fitting canvas trousers with a bib and strap top" (originally worn by workmen over other clothes to protect them from wet, dirt, etc.) is attested by 1897. Compare French surtout "overcoat," literally "an over all," from sur- "over" + tout "all."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bibelot (n.)
"small curio," 1873, from French bibelot "knick-knack," from Old French beubelet "trinket, jewel" (12c.), from belbel "plaything," a reduplication of bel "pretty" (see belle).
Related entries & more 
bibliotheca (n.)
"the Bible," also "library, place to keep books;" see bibliothec.
Related entries & more 
bibliolator (n.)
also bibliolater, "book-worshipper," 1820, perhaps first in Coleridge, from bibliolatry (q.v.). In later use, especially "one who regards the letter of the Bible with undue respect."
Related entries & more 
bibliomaniac (n.)

"one mad for books, an enthusiastic collector of rare or unusual books," 1811; see bibliomania. Earlier was bibliomane (1777), from French.

A bibliomaniac must be carefully distinguished from a bibliophile. The latter has not yet freed himself from the idea that books are meant to be read. [Walsh]
Related entries & more 
bibliophile (n.)
also bibliophil, "lover of books," 1824, from French bibliophile; see biblio- "book" + -phile "lover." Related: Bibliophilic; bibliophily.
Related entries & more