Etymology
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beverage (n.)
"drink of any kind," mid-13c., from Anglo-French beverage, Old French bevrage, from Old French boivre "to drink" (Modern French boire; from Latin bibere "to imbibe;" from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink") + -age, suffix forming mass or abstract nouns (see -age).
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bevy (n.)
early 15c., collective noun of quails and ladies, from Anglo-French bevée, which is of unknown origin. One supposed definition of the word is "a drinking bout," but this perhaps is a misprint of bever (see beverage). If not, perhaps the original sense is birds gathered at a puddle or pool for drinking or bathing. But the quest for a clear and logical origin in such a word might be futile. "These old names for companies of men and animals are however very fantastical and far-fetched" [OED].
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brew (n.)
"a brewed beverage, that which is brewed," c. 1500, from brew (v.).
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cha (n.)
"tea," 1590s, also chaw, ultimately from the Mandarin ch'a "tea;" used in English alongside tea when the beverage was introduced.
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drink (n.)

"beverage," often especially "alcoholic beverage," late Old English drinc, drync, from drink (v.). Meaning "as much of any liquid as is or may be taken at a time" is from c. 1300.

The noun, AS. drinc, would normally have given southern drinch (cf. drench), but has been influenced by the verb. [Weekley]
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cat-lap (n.)

also catlap, "thin, poor beverage (especially weak tea)," 1785; see cat (n.) + lap (v.1). The notion is "fit only to give to cats."

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toddy (n.)
1610s, alteration of taddy (1610s), tarrie (c. 1600) "beverage made from fermented palm sap," from Hindi tari "palm sap" (in which the -r- sounds close to an English -d-), from tar "palm tree," from Sanskrit tala-s, probably from a Dravidian language (compare Kannada tar, Telugu tadu). Meaning "beverage made of alcoholic liquor with hot water, sugar, and spices" first recorded 1786.
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all-sorts (n.)
name in old taverns and beer-shops for a beverage composed of remnants of other liquors mixed together, 1823, from the adjectival phrase; see all + plural of sort (n.).
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tipple (v.)
c. 1500 (implied in tippling), "sell alcoholic liquor by retail," of unknown origin, possibly from a Scandinavian source (such as Norwegian dialectal tipla "to drink slowly or in small quantities"). Meaning "drink (alcoholic beverage) too much" is first attested 1550s. Related: Tippled.
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Coca-Cola 

invented 1886 in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., by druggist Dr. John S. Pemberton. So called because original ingredients were derived from coca leaves and cola nuts. It contained minute amounts of cocaine until 1909.

Drink the brain tonic and intellectual soda fountain beverage Coca-Cola. [Atlanta Evening Journal, June 30, 1887]

Coca-colanization, also Coca-colonization was coined 1950 during an attempt to ban the beverage in France, led by the communist party and the wine-growers.

France's Communist press bristled with warnings against US "Coca-Colonization." Coke salesmen were described as agents of the OSS and the U.S. State Department. "Tremble," roared Vienna's Communist Der Abend, "Coca-Cola is on the march!" [Time magazine, March 13, 1950]

Coca-colonialism attested by 1956.

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