Etymology
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Belgium 
c. 1600, "Low Germany and the Netherlands," from the Latin name of the territory occupied by the Belgæ, a Celtic or Celto-Germanic tribe that in Roman times occupied the area below the mouth of the Rhine, including modern Belgium and much of northeastern France. Adopted 1830 as the name of a new nation formed from the southern part of the former United Kingdom of the Netherlands.
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Belgic (adj.)
1580s, "of or pertaining to the ancient Belgae," from Latin Belgicus, from Belgae (see Belgium).
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Belgian (adj.)
1620s, in reference to the ancient Belgæ (see Belgium). The modern country was formed 1830-31. Belgian Congo formed 1908 by annexation.
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Benelux 
the customs union of Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg, formed October 1947.
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Bruges 
city in modern Belgium, from plural of Flemish brug "bridge," from the Proto-Germanic source of English bridge (n.).
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Antwerp 
port city in Belgium, French Anvers, from a Germanic compound of *anda "at" + *werpum "wharf" (see wharf). Folk etymology connects the first word with hand.
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Hoboken 
city in New Jersey, U.S., birthplace of Frank Sinatra, named by 17c. Dutch settlers for a village in modern Belgium that is now a suburb of Antwerp.
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Brabant 
region in eastern Belgium (in the Middle Ages a duchy and much more extensive), from Old High German brahha "newly broken land" (see break (v.)) + bant "region." Related: Brabançon; Brabanter; Brabantine.
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spa (n.)
"medicinal or mineral spring," 1620s, from the name of the health resort in eastern Belgium, known since 14c., that features mineral springs believed to have curative properties. The place name is from Walloon espa "spring, fountain." As "commercial establishment offering health and beauty treatments," 1960.
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Walloon (adj.)

1520s, of a people of what is now souther and southeastern Belgium, also of their language, from French Wallon, literally "foreigner," of Germanic origin (compare Old High German walh "foreigner"). The people are of Gaulish origin and speak a French dialect. The name is a form of the common appellation of Germanic peoples to Romanic-speaking neighbors. See Vlach, also Welsh. As a noun from 1560s; as a language name from 1640s.

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