Etymology
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behavior (n.)

"manner of behaving (whether good or bad), conduct, manners," late 15c., essentially from behave, but with ending from Middle English havour "possession," a word altered (by influence of have) from aver, noun use of Old French verb aveir "to have."

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behavioral (adj.)

"pertaining to behavior," 1927, in psychology, from behavior + -al (1).

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behaviour (n.)

chiefly British English spelling of behavior; for suffix, see -or.

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misbehavior (n.)

also misbehaviour, "improper, rude, or uncivil behavior," late 15c., from mis- (1) + behavior.

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behaviorism (n.)

"theory that human and animal behavior can be explained in terms of conditioning," 1913, coined by U.S. psychologist John B. Watson (1878-1958) from behavior + -ism. Behaviorist is from the same time.

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antics (n.)

"ludicrous behavior," 1520s; see antic.

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comportment (n.)

"personal bearing, carriage, behavior, demeanor," 1590s, from French comportement "bearing, behavior," from comporter (13c.) "to behave," from Latin comportare "to bring together, collect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over")

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sociobiology (n.)

"study of the biological basis of social behavior," 1946, from socio- + biology. Related: Sociobiological.

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niceness (n.)

1520s, "folly, foolish behavior," from nice (q.v.) + -ness. Meaning "exactness" is from 1670s; that of "pleasantness" is from 1809.

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psychopharmacology (n.)

also psycho-pharmacology, "the science of the effects of drugs on the mind and behavior," 1919, from psycho- + pharmacology. Related: Psychopharmacological.

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